E-Workshop: How to Build Savings Groups and Other Breakthroughs in Financial Inclusion

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Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Ashe

Please note the date for this E-Workshop has changed to
Thursday, December 11th at 10:00 AM (GMT-4). 

Join us for an E-Workshop titled How to Build Savings Groups and Other Breakthroughs in Financial Inclusion

The Carsey School of Public Policy and Fundación Capital are co-hosting with the Microcredit Summit Campaign the next E-Workshop which will share insights on starting and scaling up savings groups. Both Carsey and Fundación Capital announced Campaign Commitments in 2014, and this latest E-Workshop will help microfinance and financial inclusion stakeholders to improve outreach and service with savings groups.
Register 2

What time in your country?

Join us for a discussion with Jong-Hyon Shin (Fundación Capital) and Jeffrey Ashe, which is moderated by William Maddocks (Carsey School of Public Policy). We will be discussing effective ways of forming savings groups and describe 2-hour trainings that Jong-Hyon led in the Dominican Republic.

The speakers will also share insights on linking savings groups and conditional cash transfer programs (see the recording of the Workshop titled Going to Scale: Savings Groups, Conditional Cash Transfers, and Financial Inclusion at the 17th Microcredit Summit), with the example of collaboration with ADOPEM and Fundación Capital in the Dominican Republic.

Through these valuable insights, you will gain a better understanding of the essential steps to start and scale up savings groups, and see how savings groups can contribute to financial inclusion and the end of extreme poverty.

Organization
Name
Carsey School of Public Policy
William Maddocks
Program Director, Microenterprise and Development
Moderator
Fundacion Capital
Jong-Hyon Shin
Country Project Coordinator
Carsey School of Public Policy
Jeffrey Ashe
Fellow
Co-Author of
In Their Own Hands: How Savings Groups Are Revolutionizing Development
Photo courtesy of Fundación Capital "What’s most significant about savings groups is that they are designed to be wholly managed by villagers themselves; by and large, they function as they are intended to function; and they reach impoverished people in remote rural areas who would otherwise go without any financial services, even microfinance."

Photo courtesy of Fundación Capital
“What’s most significant about savings groups is that they are designed to be wholly managed by villagers themselves; by and large, they function as they are intended to function; and they reach impoverished people in remote rural areas who would otherwise go without any financial services, even microfinance.” —David Bornstein, New York Times 


Join us for this exciting discussion to gain a deeper understanding of savings groups and hear from practitioners and researchers about their challenges, gains, and the practical applications! 


Follow this e-workshop and the Campaign’s 100 Million Project:

Learn about the 100 Million Project Project and Campaign Commitments.

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