Who will pay for the end of poverty?

RESULTS UK is launching a report called 'Who Pays for Progress?' at Addis. It is an in-depth study that looks at one country and one sector - health in Kenya - to unpick that complexity and give some guidance as to what really matters when trying to decide the right financing mix.

RESULTS UK launched a report called ‘Who Pays for Progress?’ at the Financing for Growth conference in Addis Ababa. It is an in-depth study that looks at one country and one sector — health in Kenya — to unpick that complexity and give some guidance as to what really matters when trying to decide the right financing mix. Download the report.

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On Monday, RESULTS UK (a sister organization to our RESULTS Educational Fund) released a report at the Financing for Growth conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, (which is happening right now) where the global community is negotiating who will foot the bill to eradicate poverty. 

Titled “Who Pays for Progress? The Role of Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Development Assistance in Financing Health. A Case Study from Kenya,” RESULTS UK’s report focuses on Kenya’s reclassification from a low-income country (LIC) to a lower-middle-income country (LMIC) and how that reclassification will affect financing for health needs in Kenya. Oxley’s HuffPo article lays out RESULTS’ argument for strong and ambitious commitments from the global community to finance the next phase of development goals and the end of poverty. He closes his article with this warning:

The draft text of the Addis Ababa Accord has recently been weakened. We’ve lost time-bound commitments for rich countries to meet their aid-giving targets…If our leaders cannot make the political decisions and show the leadership necessary to ensure we have the funding needed to build a more just and equitable world, then history will judge us harshly. I, for one, want to be able to say it was this generation that finished off poverty. And I know we can.

The following article by Aaron Oxley (executive director of RESULTS UK) was originally posted on Huffington Post on July 8, 2015. Read Oxley’s article below for inspiration, and to the 2015 RESULTS International Conference (July 18-21) to learn how you can make a difference and influence policy making. 


One of the things I love about my job is that I get to be optimistic every day. That’s because I, and my colleagues working in international development, look at the problems of the world that are rooted in poverty and inequality, and refuse to accept that the world is not smart enough or rich enough to defeat them.

The evidence of history is on our side. Since the year 2000 the world has halved the number of people living in extreme poverty, the mortality rate for children under five has dropped almost 50%, millions more children live past their fifth birthday, and 90% of children now attend primary school. It’s been the best 15 years our species has had in its entire existence, with 1.7 billion undernourished people in 1999 dropping to ‘just’ 836m today. While we have a long way to go, that’s staggering progress.

That poverty still exists is a question of politics. Should we get the politics right, we can continue and accelerate those rapid gains and, truly, wipe out poverty in the next 15 years. At which point I’ll be happily out of a job.

This year, the world is coming together in a series of global meetings to decide the level of political ambition we’ll bring to the eradication of poverty. If we aim high, I get to head off to a beach somewhere in 2030. If we fail, the price isn’t just that my retirement is delayed: it means more human suffering and unnecessary death, a drag on economic growth that hurts us all, and wastes the potential of hundreds of millions of lives.

The first of those critical meetings is the Financing for Growth conference in Addis Ababa, happening from the 13th to 16th of July. This conference is all about the money: how are we going to pay for the end of poverty, and who will pay for what? I’d assert that money is not the most important element in ending global poverty, but it’s clear that so much simply cannot and will not happen without it.

Continue reading…

Aaron Oxley with John Mathai of Global Health Advocates India and a RESULTS US grassroots volunteer at the 2011 RESULTS International Conference.
Follow Aaron Oxley on Twitter: @ATOxley