#tbt: Clients Continue Movement above the US$1 a day Threshold

The study found that, on net, 1.8 million microcredit client households, including 9.43 million household members, crossed the $1.25 a day poverty threshold between 1990 and 2008.

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We are pleased to bring you this #ThursdayThrowback blog post, which was originally published in The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report 2011. We commissioned a study to estimate the net number of microcredit client households in Bangladesh that crossed the US$1.25 a day threshold between 1990 and 2008. You can download a copy of the study from our Resource Library as well.


Authored by Sajjad Zohir, the director of the Economic Research Group; he is based in Bangladesh.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign is committed to using microfinance to powerfully contribute to the end of poverty. Its decade-long focus on client poverty measurement and progress out of poverty underscores this commitment. To this end, the Campaign continues to track progress towards its second goal to ensure that, from a starting point in 1990, 100 million of the world’s poorest families move from below US$1 a day adjusted for purchasing power parity (PPP) to above US$1 a day adjusted for PPP by 2015.

Evidence from Bangladesh

Findings from a nationwide study in Bangladesh commissioned by the Campaign shows promising results. The study, undertaken by the Bangladesh-based Economic Research Group, was administered between February and August 2009. Researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of 4,000 Bangladeshi microcredit clients and estimated the net number of households in Bangladesh that crossed the US$1.25 a day threshold between 1990 and 2008.[1]

The study found that, on net, 1.8 million microcredit client households, including 9.43 million household members, crossed the $1.25 a day poverty threshold between 1990 and 2008. A second key issue raised in the report, seen in Figure 1 below, was that in some years a large percentage of clients left poverty, whereas, in years coinciding with the 1998 floods and the food crisis of 2008, many households, including some who where non-poor when they joined the microcredit program, slide below the $1.25 threshold.

Figure 1: Percentage of Client Households, on Net, Crossing the US$1.25 Threshold in Bangladesh

Figure 1: Percentage of Client Households, on Net, Crossing the US$1.25 Threshold in Bangladesh
Data showed that among those taking their first microcredit loan between 1990 and 2008, the following poorest client households crossed the US$1.25 threshold:

1990-1993 8.94%
1994-1997 19.83%
1998-2002 0.33%
2003-2008 1.84%

It is important to note that the findings in this report were significantly influenced by the period in which the data was collected. In 1998 Bangladesh suffered from what are often described as the most severe floods ever to hit the country. In 2008, a food crisis coupled with political instability in Bangladesh and the global economic crisis led to a general slack in economic activities. All these factors may have led to the depletion of assets that are commonly chosen as proxies to measure poverty status among the very poor in Bangladesh. This in turn may have led to under-estimation of the number of microcredit client households that may have otherwise crossed the threshold.


Footnote

[1] This study made no attempt to establish causality between microcredit and poverty alleviation. Instead, it simply estimates the change in status of microcredit client households between 1990 and 2008, when compared with their status during the time of the first loan received by any member of the household.


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