We are all lobbyists

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.


Susan Fleurant, 2015 RESULTS U.S. Poverty Campaigns Intern, blogged about her first citizen lobbying experience.

I arrived in Washington, D.C. this summer for an internship at RESULTS with only the certainty of ceaseless heat and humidity and not fully knowing what else to expect. Then on June 9, I went to Capitol Hill and lobbied for the first time with Bread for the World, an anti-hunger organization. Lobbying is a word that carries with it a heavily negative connotation, a word that evokes images of wealthy businessmen persuading legislators one way or another. As a student pursuing a career in policy, I always said that I would never be a lobbyist, because I subscribed to this professional and negative definition of the word. While much of politics in the United States these days does involve the interests of wealthy corporations and professional lobbyists, the reality is that we can all be lobbyists.

It is easy to forget that Congress works for us, the voters. Our votes put people into office, and our votes can remove people from office. Yes, that oversimplifies the process, and while I acknowledge the role of campaign finance and special interests in both the campaign and legislative processes, citizens are not doing enough to change what has become the not-so-pleasant status quo of American politics. The truth is, the United States has abysmal voter turnout, yet a high percentage of the population complains about those in office and policy decisions that are made.

Join us at the 2015 RESULTS International Conference in Washington, D.C., this July 18-21.
Español | Français | Continue reading

Why go to an advocacy conference?

Gallery

This gallery contains 4 photos.

This blog post was cross-posted from Cynthia Changyit Levin’s blog (@ccylevin), Anti-Poverty Mom: Raising my voice & my kids.

To all my readers raising tiny children and learning to advocate, I’m going to say something to you that may sound a little crazy. I think it’s time you go to an advocacy conference in Washington D.C. Many advocacy organizations with a national presence that have been around for a good number of years have conferences in D.C. where you can learn from experts about your issue, hear inspirational speakers, and lobby your members of Congress. If you can rustle up the child care, I think you should find one you like and go to it!Join us at the 2015 RESULTS International Conference to learn new skills, hear from experts, and raise your voice on Capitol Hill this July 18th to 21st.
Español | Français | Continue reading

How you can influence global policy priorities at the World Bank (event)

Gallery

This gallery contains 4 photos.

RESULTS is hosting its 35th annual International Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington DC from July 18th to July 21st, featuring many leading poverty experts, activists. and policy makers.In just two weeks, RESULTS Educational Fund, the parent organization of the Microcredit Summit Campaign, will celebrate its 35th anniversary with the 2015 RESULTS International Conference in Washington, D.C. Attendees will hear from leading experts, activists, and policymakers on the challenges and solutions to ending poverty. Join World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), and Nobel laureate Muhammad Yunus.

We invite you to join in the festivities and attend our workshop called “Partnerships to End Poverty: Health, Government, and Financial Services” on Sunday, July 19th at 4:30 – 6:00 PM. Our session will focus on integrated health and microfinance and linking the graduation model and conditional cash transfers (CCTs). Sonja Kelly (CFI) will moderate a panel discussion with Olumide Elegbe (FHI 360), Dr. DSK Rao, and Larry Reed. Join us to learn why these are key pathways to help end extreme poverty and how you can influence the global development agenda. Español | Français | Continue reading

Equitas commits to improve focus on clients and service coverage

Gallery

This gallery contains 4 photos.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes Equitas, a major Indian microfinance institution (MFI), as the 56th organization to make a Campaign Commitment, joining a global coalition working to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty.

Equitas is committing to expand its financial services and non-financial services to the following number of clients in the financial year 2015-2016 :

* Provide 1.5 million clients with financial services.
* Cover 70,000 clients under the food security program.
* Cover 50,000 clients under the health education program.
* Screen the health of 850,000 clients.
* Partner hospitals will provide 3,000 Equitas clients discounted consultation/ treatment.

Español | Français | Continue reading

Grama Vidiyal commits to expanding health services to clients

Gallery


Creating a “window for the poor” to financial and other services.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes Grama Vidiyal, a major Indian microfinance institution (MFI), as the 55th organization to make a Campaign Commitment, joining a global coalition working to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty.

Grama Vidiyal commits to expand its financial and non-financial services to the following number of clients in the financial year 2015-2016:

  • Provide an additional 150,000 clients with financial services in FY15
  • Help 1,050,000 community members through Grama Vidiyal’s empowerment program.
  • Organize 720 health camps for clients, screening 300,000 members.
  • Provide 10,000 clients with discounted consultation/treatment in partner hospitals.
  • Provide health education to 80,000 client families (or community).
  • Give access to health related products and medicines to 150,000 clients.

Español | Français | Continue reading

Measuring client health outcomes using simple indicators

Gallery

A local community health volunteer trained and supervised by Bandhan, an Indian MFI, meets with members of a local self-help group and their families. (Photo courtesy of Johnson & Johnson)
>>Authored by Sabina Rogers, Communications and Relationships Manager

More than two years ago, we set out with Freedom from Hunger to develop and test a standardized set of health indicators as part of a Campaign Commitment we co-launched in 2013. This has culminated with the release of Healthy, Wealthy and Wise: How Microfinance Institutions Can Track the Health of Clients. The report describes our experience in selecting and pilot-testing a set of indicators. It will help you choose the right indicators for monitoring client health outcomes over time. And finally, the report summarizes key recommendations for developing “standardized” client outcome monitoring indicators.

We hope financial services providers and others will use our “health outcome performance indicators” (HOPI) to assess the health and well-being of clients and their families. We believe that wide usage of the HOPI would create short- and long-term value for practitioners (both health and financial services), social investors and donors, raters, and other actors. “Health” is a basic need that crosses all borders and all demographics, making the HOPI compelling measures for understanding client outcomes for financial service providers.

Read this new report to choose the right health indicators for your institution

Español | Français | Continue reading

Six learning opportunities for the “Six Pathways”

Gallery

This gallery contains 7 photos.

Educational opportunities from the Carsey School of Public Policy Lea en españolLisez en français Continue reading

Accessible and affordable microinsurance with Afua Donkor

Gallery

This gallery contains 2 photos.

#ThrowbackThursday comes from the 2014 Report EspañolFrançais Continue reading

The 2015 Listening Tour: Mapping pathways for ending extreme poverty

Gallery

This gallery contains 3 photos.

After the success of Generation Next: Innovation in Microfinance, our 17th Microcredit Summit (Mexico in 2014), the Microcredit Summit Campaign conducted a Listening Tour to identify how this next generation could contribute to ending extreme poverty (those living on less than $1.25 a day) by 2030. The theme that emerges from this consultation will be reflected across the Campaign: in the 2015 State of the Campaign Report, the 18th Microcredit Summit, and Campaign Commitments.

With the post-2015 development agenda under negotiation, the financial inclusion and microfinance sectors have an opportunity to assess our role in shaping the international development framework and reflect on the impact we can have on the lives of millions of the world´s extreme poor. Our Listening Tour was the first step in surveying our coalition of partners to see what our role in this endeavor should be.

The Listening Tour was our time to listen — and your time to speak — on the issues that the microfinance and financial inclusion sector face and served two purposes. First, it was our hope to find out how our audience (you) felt about the World Bank’s goal of eradicating poverty by 2030, and equally important, we wished to consult you in identifying the topics that were most pressing and urgent.
Español | Français | Continue reading

Microcredit Summit Campaign joins World Bank’s financial inclusion efforts

Gallery

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Press release issued today EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Measuring what’s important: client transformation

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.

What types of indicators being used to measure “transformation”? EspañolFrançais Continue reading

#tbt: Microfinance as a Platform for Health Education

Gallery

This gallery contains 2 photos.

KNOWLEDGE ABOUT HIV VIRUS
The Microcredit Summit Campaign launched its Financing Healthier Lives Project in 2002. The project aims to build a global group of microfinance institutions capable of providing health education trainings to their clients in a sustainable manner and reach over half a million clients affecting some 2.5 million family members.

In March 2009, the Campaign released an updated version of its report outlining how microfinance can be used as a platform for health education. This strategy has proven effective at enhancing clients’ movement out of poverty, especially in situations where microfinance aloneis insufficient. The document, titled Financing Healthier Lives, makes the case for a global expansion in the use of microfinance as a platform for health education and other health services.

#ThrowbackThursday comes from The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report 2011

Español | Français | Continue reading

Exploring the potential of low-income women in Pakistan

Gallery

This gallery contains 4 photos.

Photo Credit: Kashf Foundation

Last year, Kashf Foundation made a Campaign Commitment to increase the number of persons from low-income communities who were accessing health insurance to 100,000, and Kashf surpassed this target by nearly one-third. At the end of 2014, Kashf was able to cover 129,000 women, men, and children from poor households with health insurance.

“Upon reaching the hospital, I looked hesitantly at my daughter, but seeing her face full of pain and agony, I realized I had to be brave for her. The hospital was the biggest I had ever seen, and I was sure that the doctors would not even consider treating my daughter. But, as soon as I showed them my insurance card, not only was I treated with the utmost respect, they arranged the best possible care for my daughter without taking a single penny from me.” — Noshaba

Noshaba and her daughter belong to one of those Kashf families who have been able to access high quality healthcare as result of the Kashf Micro-health Insurance product. Kashf’s innovative product provides health insurance coverage to the entire household up to Rs. 30,000 of in-patient expenses for every member of the household! Kashf’s health insurance also covers maternity benefits and provides clients with a work-compensation settlement if either of the main breadwinners for the household is hospitalized.

Español | Français | Continue reading