An interview with Larry Reed

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>> An interview with Larry Reed, director of the Microcredit Summit Campaign by Miranda Beshara

The first Microcredit Summit was held in 1997 and called for a nine-year campaign to reach 100 million of the world’s poorest families. In 2005, the Campaign was re-launched until 2015. In 2016, where does the Microcredit Summit Campaign stand and how does the future look like?

At the Halifax Global Summit in 2006, the microfinance community set two new goals for the Campaign. First, to reach 175 million of the world’s poorest families with microfinance and, second, to see 100 million of the world’s poorest families move out of extreme poverty. Our latest numbers, from 2014, show we still have a lot of work to do to reach those goals. Much of the growth of microfinance in recent years has been with families that are not living in extreme poverty. We have focused our attention on the types of finance that reaches to the poorest families, and helps them limit vulnerabilities and take advantage of opportunities.

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Research on Ecuador’s digital platform to be featured at 18th Microcredit Summit

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The Microcredit Summit Campaign, as part of its 6 Pathways, is helping to highlight ways that digital platforms are helping to expand financial inclusion, especially for the extreme poor. We are pleased to share with you this Executive Summary of their research.

At the 18th Microcredit Summit this research will be included in the breakout session “The Digital Revolution and Financial Inclusion.” We hope to see you there!


>> Authored by Jorge Moncayo and Marcos Reis.

Financial systems have a vital role in national economies. They provide savings, credit, payment, and risk management products to society. In this sense, inclusive financial systems — those with a high share of individuals and firms that use financial services — are especially likely to benefit poor people and other disadvantaged groups. On the contrary, poor people must rely on their limited savings to invest in their education or become entrepreneurs. In addition, small enterprises must rely on their limited earnings to pursue promising growth opportunities (Demirguc-Kunt and Klapper, 2012).

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18th Microcredit Summit update: Dates extended at no extra cost

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Responding to intense demand for more sessions, we have decided to extend the days of the 18th Microcredit Summit at no extra charge!
We have some exciting developments with the Summit agenda to share with everyone. Responding to intense demand for more sessions, we have decided to extend the days of the 18th Microcredit Summit at no extra charge!

The new dates will be Monday, March 14th to Thursday, March 17th, so please be sure to plan your travel dates to be in attendance for the Welcome Ceremony, which will now take place in the morning of March 14th. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause you, but we hope the program will make it worth your while.

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Implementing national financial inclusion mandates in the Arab region

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MCS+KF+AGFUND+AMF+18MCSummit logos longBeth Rhyne’s recent review of the Davos report “Guidance on the application of the core principles for effective banking supervision to the regulation and supervision of institutions relevant to financial inclusion” articulately and clearly present some of the chief benefits of the Davos meeting as well as outline some of the important work that still largely remains in context of framing regulations to support achieving full financial inclusion.

The Campaign, like the Center for Financial Inclusion, has a mission that focuses on ensuring that as financial inclusion strategies are developed become the prime means of moving forward the global agenda to end poverty, that these strategies are sure to include those who are among the hardest to reach populations. This will take a mix of new and innovative programs as well as, as Beth Rightly phrased it, a reinvention of how regulatory frameworks facilitate those programs.

At the 18th Microcredit Summit, the Campaign is organizing, in partnership with the Arab Monetary Fund (AMF) and the Arab Gulf Fund for Development (AGFUND), a special meeting of Governors of central banks throughout the Arab region to discuss recent progress in achieving this redefined shape and meeting their financial inclusion mandates. With participation from key stakeholders like GIZ, CGAP, and others, we will be facilitating a deep discussion on the importance of many of the key issues that Beth has raised. Learn more about this side event, called “Implementing National Financial Inclusion Mandates.”

We encourage you to read her assessment on where Davos has brought the regulatory sector and what roads and challenges lie ahead for it. Furthermore, if the topic really grabs you, the Davos report is open for public comment until March 31, 2016.

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Create lasting change at the 18th Microcredit Summit

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The 2015 State of the Campaign Report underscores the challenge microfinance faces in realizing its original goal — to alleviate poverty by providing quality microfinance services to the poorest segments of society. In it, we make the case for the scale-up of financial services “pathways” that can advance the end of extreme poverty with prescriptive actions for financial service providers, government policymakers, and others. These “Six Pathways,” which you can read all about in the report, will be featured throughout our 18th Microcredit Summit.

Financial inclusion is “the first step” in achieving the World Bank’s twin goals by “giving people the tools to get out of poverty [by 2030] and into shared prosperity,” as explained by Alfonso García Mora at the 17th Microcredit Summit in Mexico. Participants will engage in a thoughtful discussion around effective ways to reach the most vulnerable and marginalized and the microfinance services and financial inclusion strategies that promote inclusive, sustainable economic growth and social empowerment that helps improve their lives.

Join us in Abu Dhabi, U.A.E., on March 14-17, 2016, for another great microfinance conference!

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New report calls for scale-up of financial services “pathways” to help end extreme poverty

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The Microcredit Summit Campaign released our 17th annual survey of the global microfinance industry Wednesday at the Inclusive Finance India Summit held in New Delhi, India. Larry Reed featured the publication, Mapping Pathways out of Poverty: The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report, 2015, in his presentation on Wednesday to attendees of India’s premier financial inclusion conference.

What does the 2015 report say about the data?
According to our annual survey, the global microfinance community reached 211 million borrowers as of December 31, 2013, and 114 million of them were living in extreme poverty (households living on less than $1.90 per day, PPP).

What this means is that, while the microfinance community provided loans to the most clients since we began tracking this number in 1997, the number of poorest clients fell for the third straight year. This is concerning.

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Where’s the Map? Another sneak peek!

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John Snow mapped out London's cholera epidemic in the 1850s. This helped my make connections between seemingly unrelated unrelated
“A map does not just chart, it unlocks and formulates meaning; it forms bridges between here and there, between disparate ideas that we did not know were previously connected.”
— Reif Larsen, The Selected Works of T.S. Spivet

How does BRAC, the world’s largest non-governmental organization (NGO), develop pathways out of poverty for the poorest people in a village? They begin with a map. As you see in the photo on the cover of this report, they bring the village together and start drawing maps in the dirt, identifying each household, market, business, and place of worship. They then ask the help of the community to identify the poorest households, marking each one on the map. Their work begins with those households.

This painstaking, household-by-household approach of identifying the excluded and locating them within their community and context represents the next step that we need to take to achieve a new set of ambitious global development goals.

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Sneak peek of the 2015 State of the Campaign Report

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The map on the right illustrates the prevalence of below $1.90 per day poverty in rural areas. Source: Adapted from World Bank Data (online), 2015, "Rural Population (% of total population)," http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.RUR.TOTL.ZS; and ibid., "Poverty gap at $1.90 a day (PPP 2011) (%)," http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SI.POV.GAPS.
The World Bank and the United Nations have both set their sights on ending extreme poverty by the year 2030. The Bank has also set a concomitant target of universal financial access by 2020 as a major contributor to ending extreme poverty. Our assessment, after reviewing the contributions that microfinance institutions and other financial providers have made toward these two goals, is this: if financial services are meant to play an important part in bringing an end to extreme poverty, we will not come close to reaching it.

Microfinance has demonstrated the viability of providing financial services to people in poverty and technological advances have drastically reduced the cost of providing financial services. But, we still do not see widespread adoption of financial services among the largest groups of those that still need to be reached: those living in extreme poverty.

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Insufficient and greatly uneven progress on the maternal health MDG

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>>Authored by Marion Cosquer and Sabina Rogers

MDG 5: Improve maternal health

Target 5.A: Reduce by three quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio

In 1990, 380 pregnant women were dying for every 100,000 live births. As of 2013, the global maternal mortality ratio has decreased by 45 percent to 210 women per 100,000 live births. The highest gains were seen in South and Southeast Asia with a 64 percent and 57 percent reduction, respectively. Developing regions overall achieved a 46 percent reduction. Maternal survival has been aided by a one-third increase in childbirth attendance by skilled health personnel. Thus, the news in the U.N. Millennium Development Goals Report for MDG 5 is promising.

Nonetheless, progress towards improving maternal health so far falls far short of the targets set under MDG 5 and has lagged far behind the other MDGs. Additionally, global figures tend to mask regional inequalities. For example, there were 510 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa compared to 190 in South Asia and 140 in Southeast Asia.

Progress in raising the proportion of births delivered with skilled personnel has been modest over the last 15 years, reflecting the lack of universal access to care. Indeed, one in four babies still being delivered without skilled personnel and wide disparities are found among regions. For example, there is a 52 percent spread between the largest rural/urban disparity across regions:

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Voices from the Field: Beth Porter

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Talks about what’s next for the microfinance industry in a post-MDG era EspañolFrançais Continue reading

The 2015 Listening Tour: Mapping pathways for ending extreme poverty

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After the success of Generation Next: Innovation in Microfinance, our 17th Microcredit Summit (Mexico in 2014), the Microcredit Summit Campaign conducted a Listening Tour to identify how this next generation could contribute to ending extreme poverty (those living on less than $1.25 a day) by 2030. The theme that emerges from this consultation will be reflected across the Campaign: in the 2015 State of the Campaign Report, the 18th Microcredit Summit, and Campaign Commitments.

With the post-2015 development agenda under negotiation, the financial inclusion and microfinance sectors have an opportunity to assess our role in shaping the international development framework and reflect on the impact we can have on the lives of millions of the world´s extreme poor. Our Listening Tour was the first step in surveying our coalition of partners to see what our role in this endeavor should be.

The Listening Tour was our time to listen — and your time to speak — on the issues that the microfinance and financial inclusion sector face and served two purposes. First, it was our hope to find out how our audience (you) felt about the World Bank’s goal of eradicating poverty by 2030, and equally important, we wished to consult you in identifying the topics that were most pressing and urgent.
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Voices from the Field: William Derban

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Innovation is key: develop new ideas and adapt what works elsewhere to each country EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Can tablets and apps fight poverty?

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We can talk about innovation and we can talk about technology, but when we work on poverty reduction, the most important thing we need to talk about is community.

It is only when we understand what capabilities and tools already exist and are being used within a community that we can develop and explore new technologies and solutions for that community. And it is only by working together with the social innovation community that we can ensure that these new tools can reach millions and have a lasting impact.

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Is it April Fools’ Day, or ‘Groundhog Day’?

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When will researchers catch up with microfinance leaders? EspañolFrançais Continue reading