Webinar recap: Is it too late for microfinance to be pro poor?

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mh6iw8-lbKE&feature=youtu.be
On April 21st, the Microcredit Summit Campaign co-hosted with Uplift a webinar discussion focusing on the promise that graduation holds for sustainably reaching the ultra-poor. Our featured speakers were Debasish Ray Chaudhuri, CEO of Bandhan Konnagar in India, Rachel Proefke, a research associate with BRAC Uganda, Mark Daniels, the Philippines director for Opportunity International, and Allison Duncan, CEO of Amplifier Strategies and founder of Uplift. Anne Hastings, a global advocate with Uplift, moderated the webinar.

The conversation looked closely at the experiences that each of the three practitioners on the panel have had in implementing the program as well as the global advocacy message supporting the graduation approach being delivered by Uplift and its allies.

We hope you will get engaged with this promising avenue for reaching those living in ultra-poverty and be inspired by the potential it holds for helping microfinance institutions to reconnect to their original purpose. Some final thoughts from speakers on the webinar follow.

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#tbt: 2011 workshop paper on microfinance for remote, hard-to-reach areas

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#Tbt_18
In 2011, we commissioned more than 40 papers to accompany the workshops and plenaries organized at our Global Microcredit Summit 2011. This week’s #ThrowbackThursday is a great opportunity to review the wealth of knowledge generated by the Summit. Listen to the audio recording from the workshop here.


What is the Cutting Edge for Microfinance in Remote, Hard to Reach Areas?

Authors: Anne Hastings and Steven Werlin

Introduction

Maximizing access to financial services in remote rural areas requires us to face a range of challenges that demand, in turn, a range of solutions. The problem is no more uniform than the regions that the services need to get to or the nature of the services required.

Access is not an end in itself but merely an important means towards progress for rural families and the communities they inhabit. That means that there are two sides to the question of access. On one hand, we must ask: what are the most effective ways to deliver financial services to especially hard-to-reach areas. Getting standard financial services to some areas presents significant challenges. On the other, there are distinct products and services that can help families living in remote rural areas in important ways. In other words, there is both a question of delivery of services and a separate question of the design of those services. In this paper, we have chosen to focus almost exclusively on the delivery of services.

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The importance of measuring client outcomes

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Outcomes process
The World Bank is hosting a day-long event today (as I write this, actually) presenting lessons and implications of the latest research on microcredit. Based on the swiftness of my Twitter feed, the event, “Financial Services for the Poor: Lessons and Implications of the Latest Research on Credit,” is very popular and timely. (You can follow it using the hashtags #WBlive and #Microcredit2015.) Much of the evidence shared this morning (when they had a live video feed of the event), confirmed our understanding that microcredit alone is not enough.[1]

Indeed, the speakers in the 10 AM session (agenda), in response to an audience question, “If you had $1 million, how much of it would you put toward microfinance?”, recommended that we should invest our money in human capitol, namely early childhood education and conditional cash transfers (CCTs).

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