Post-MDG 2: Bringing the “last mile” children into our schools

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The United Nations recently issued The Millennium Development Goals Report, 2015, the latest assessment of progress towards the eight MDGs. In short, they have had mixed results. This article is part of a blog series reflecting on the MDGs and the U.N. report. These are produced in partnership with our colleagues at RESULTS (our parent organization).

MDG 2 is focused on primary school enrollment for children everywhere, including the poorest of the poor. The children of tens of millions microfinance clients may be some of the “last milers” still left behind, still excluded from primary school, and many MFIs are actively working to solve the access gap in their own corner of the world. For example, ESAF Microfinance (India) has just launched a Commitment to reach at least 2,000 children with educational programs for academic growth and value education. Fafidess (Guatemala) committed to offer education loans to their clients.


>>Authored by William C. Smith, Right to Education Index Senior Associate, RESULTS Educational Fund

Millennium Development Goal Achievements

graph_MDG2-out-of-school childrenTarget 2.A: Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling

During the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) period, the world saw a huge surge in the number of students enrolled in primary school. In 2015, an estimated 91 percent of all primary age students are enrolled in primary school with the largest increases in enrollment over the 15-year period found in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia.

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#tbt: The Faces Behind the Statistics

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#ThrowbackThursday
Janèt Dèval, a client of Fonkoze, a microcredit institution in Haiti, is one of the 66.6 million poorest clients reached. Janèt has been a credit client for more than two years and comes regularly to all meetings. She has also been a part of every literacy program available and is about to start the newest module on developing business skills. Not only could she not read or write when she started, but she has had an extra challenge: Janèt has only a fraction of her hearing due to an injury when she was 20 years old.

When I found out that Fonkoze gave literacy classes for market women, I was so happy. I never went to school even one day. I didn’t know anything about school. I started right away with basic literacy and I have tried to never miss a class.
I finished Alfa Baz and Alfa Pos and then I went to the Health Program, too. I still don’t know many things, so I want to keep going. I take my notebook to my school and I write in it because one day I hope to read and understand everything. I bought two books in the market and my kids help me read them.
I work hard in the market so that I can repay my loans, keep going to school and so that my kids have that chance, too. If my parents would have sent me to school, I would have thrown a party for them to say thank you.

We are pleased to bring you this #ThursdayThrowback blog post, which was originally published in The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report 2005.

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Measuring what’s important: client transformation

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What types of indicators being used to measure “transformation”? EspañolFrançais Continue reading

New Partnerships against Poverty: Health and Financial Services

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When hundreds of millions of women like Alpana can enjoy health, savings, good work, and a sense of achievement and security for their families, we will know that our job is done EspañolFrançais Continue reading

When Helping is Seen as a Luxury by Marisse Galera

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…I had been conditioned to draw my eyes away from the poverty that surrounded me, to cringe at the touch of a dirty hand reaching out, and to generally be disgusted with the people who need my help the most…I realized that the only thing I was really willing to give were rejects and rejection…As people who have faced constant rejection, what the poor need the most is empowerment, and this can be done through offering social protection and inclusion. As Gov. Tetangco said, we have given them access to microcredit from formal financial service providers, and the challenge is how to reach out to the millions of people who live in extreme poverty…Alleviating millions of people from extreme poverty is possible, but it requires a change of perspective, and more importantly, a change in the system. Continue reading

News Round-up for Friday, July 5

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This week’s round-up includes the wrap-up of Chris Dunford’s Evidence Project blog. A must read!
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News Round-up for Friday, June 28

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World Bank President issues challenge to private sector, financial education at SEWA, and microfinance in Myanmar.Español Français Continue reading

News Round-up

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A special UN report on post-2015 agenda, measures from the World Bank to accelerate progress on malnutrition, and research on how VSLAs affect the well-being of children.Español Français Continue reading

Institutional Action Plan Raffle Winner: Community Development Society Nagpur

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Congratulations to this week’s winner of the Raffle for Institutional Action Plan Submitters, Community Development Society, Nagpur of India!EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Last Week’s News

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Read our round up of last week’s microfinance news: A Financially Capable Consumer Could Be Your Best Customer, The Future of Provider Ecosystems for Financial Inclusion, How to Build Successful BOP Business Models, and more! Continue reading

Last Week’s News

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A round up of last week’s microfinance news: tests for credit bubbles, a challenge to the “old way” of thinking about microfinance, promising BoP business models in Latin America, and another paper about mbanking. Continue reading