Better health for every woman and every child in the Philippines

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HMHB videoThe maternal mortality rate in the Philippines is among the highest in Southeast Asia. To help improve maternal health in the Philippines, three development institutions have come together to implement the Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies: Kalinga kay Inay Project.

More than 800,000 women have received vital information to ensure healthy pregnancies, and thousands more will. At community health fairs like you see in the short video above, thousands of women have received free OB/GYN consultations, have signed up for the national health insurance, PhilHealth, and have received free prenatal vitamins. We’re reaching for better health for every woman and every child. Join us.

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Insufficient and greatly uneven progress on the maternal health MDG

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>>Authored by Marion Cosquer and Sabina Rogers

MDG 5: Improve maternal health

Target 5.A: Reduce by three quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio

In 1990, 380 pregnant women were dying for every 100,000 live births. As of 2013, the global maternal mortality ratio has decreased by 45 percent to 210 women per 100,000 live births. The highest gains were seen in South and Southeast Asia with a 64 percent and 57 percent reduction, respectively. Developing regions overall achieved a 46 percent reduction. Maternal survival has been aided by a one-third increase in childbirth attendance by skilled health personnel. Thus, the news in the U.N. Millennium Development Goals Report for MDG 5 is promising.

Nonetheless, progress towards improving maternal health so far falls far short of the targets set under MDG 5 and has lagged far behind the other MDGs. Additionally, global figures tend to mask regional inequalities. For example, there were 510 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa compared to 190 in South Asia and 140 in Southeast Asia.

Progress in raising the proportion of births delivered with skilled personnel has been modest over the last 15 years, reflecting the lack of universal access to care. Indeed, one in four babies still being delivered without skilled personnel and wide disparities are found among regions. For example, there is a 52 percent spread between the largest rural/urban disparity across regions:

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Post MDG-4: Integrating health services to reduce child mortality

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UFMR map of world 2015_UNICEF
The United Nations recently issued The Millennium Development Goals Report, 2015, the latest assessment of progress towards the eight MDGs. In short, they have had mixed results. This article is part of a blog series reflecting on the MDGs and the U.N. report. These are produced in partnership with our colleagues at RESULTS.


>>Authored by Carley Tucker and Sabina Rogers

MDG 4: Reduce child mortality

Target 4.A: Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate

The numbers appear heartening. According to the latest assessment on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), deaths of infants and children under five have greatly reduced. The under-five mortality rate has declined by more than half, from 90 to 43 deaths per 1000 births. Moreover, the annual rate of reduction in child deaths has more than doubled since 1990, and the rate has accelerated the most in Africa.

We learn that 4 out of every 5 of children have received at least one dose of the measles vaccine, preventing 15.6 million deaths between 2000 and 2013. In all, some 48 million children under five are alive today because of smart investments and increasing access to cost-effective health programs over the last 15 years.

This is good news for children around the world; however, underlying these advances is news that the achievements are not equitably distributed regionally, between rural and urban areas, nor socioeconomically.

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Free ultrasounds draw thousands to community health fairs

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World leaders are convening in New York this week to finalize the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, an ambitious plan that will build on the successes and tackle problems where the Millennium Development Goals fell short. Freedom from Hunger and the Microcredit Summit Campaign are partnering with CARD Mutually Reinforcing Institutions (CARD MRI) to implement an 18-month project to address one of these MDG achievement gaps: maternal health in the Philippines. The project, “Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies: Kalinga kay Inay,” is supported by an educational grant from Johnson & Johnson and will wrap up in December.

We have prepared a newsletter to let you know how things are going. To receive a copy of the newsletter, please sign up for our integrated health and microfinance news mailing list. Here is a sneak peek at the first issue of our Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies: Kalinga kay Inay Project Newsletter.

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