Can tablets and apps fight poverty?

Kids learning_LISTA_599x450

Kids use the financial literacy app developed by Fundacíon Capital called LISTA
Photo credit: Fundacíon Capital

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


>>Authored by Julieta Bossi, Communications Officer, Fundación Capital

MoMF

April is the Month of Microfinance

We can talk about innovation and we can talk about technology, but when we work on poverty reduction, the most important thing we need to talk about is community.

It is only when we understand what capabilities and tools already exist and are being used within a community that we can develop and explore new technologies and solutions for that community. And it is only by working together with the social innovation community that we can ensure that these new tools can reach millions and have a lasting impact.

At Fundación Capital we work to eliminate poverty by fostering economic, financial, and social inclusion. Without economic opportunities and financial abilities, one cannot obtain full citizenship, including all of the rights and responsibilities that it entails. Therefore, our main goal is to promote financial inclusion and create economic citizenship. We do this by strengthening the productive, financial, human, and social assets of people living in conditions of poverty and extreme poverty, empowering them to find their own way out of poverty. Throughout this process, we rely on innovation and technology that we created in partnership with the community to provide sustainable and effective solutions.

Fundación Capital works with public and private institutions, helping government entities to create more innovative and efficient public policies and helping the private sector to develop products and services that fulfill needs at the base of the pyramid.

Working with communities, we identify needs and preferences that guide the design of new solutions we dream up and develop. Existing knowledge, capabilities, and social capital become the springboard for innovation and represent valuable tools that can be combined with digital solutions to generate real and effective change with the potential to reach millions, including those living in the most remote and rural regions.

A client of Fundacíon Capital wiht her daughter Photo credit: Fundacíon Capital

A client of Fundacíon Capital wiht her daughter

Photo credit: Fundacíon Capital

Through this process of innovation and co-creation, we have developed a number of digital solutions. One of them is LISTA, an initiative that was born out of the need to provide financial education to millions of conditional cash transfer recipients in a cost-effective way. LISTA offers interactive and relevant content delivered via a tablet computer provided to the families. The app called “Produciendo por mi futuro” provides tips for financial planning, familiarizes users with ATMs and mobile money through simulators, and seeks to break barriers between low-income communities and the formal financial system. This tool is brought into families’ homes, providing users with the opportunity to study on their own time, concentrate on topics most relevant to their needs, and include all family members in the learning process.

Another way we transfer knowledge to less advantaged communities living in remote areas is through government, this app teaches them how to run a business, manage and invest the capital into productive activities. It ensures that these injections of capital will be invested and provide a foundation to build on and eventually graduate out of poverty. Once they’ve built up their businesses, communities can access additional funding through LittleBigMoney, Latin America’s first crowdfunding platform for projects or businesses led by bottom of the pyramid entrepreneurs or whose impact benefits vulnerable communities.

Another challenge encountered in poverty alleviation programs is training field workers and ensuring the quality of the financial education they deliver. Since they engage with the community on a daily basis, it is important that they are properly trained, so we have created an e-learning course for fieldworkers working with our graduation program.

We also provide fieldworkers with the “Produciendo por mi futuro” app  to increase their productivity. The fieldworkers leave the tablets with participating families, who study the material over the course of the week, so that when they meet with their fieldworker “coach”, they can have more productive and personalized conversations with real outcomes. The app empowers families living in extreme poverty, by offering them financial education and business training.

After years of working on designing, developing, and implementing these kinds of solutions, we have come to understand that the most important input for our work and innovation is the constant feedback we receive from communities. They are our inspiration and a great source of ideas for constant improvement and adjustment. While we can’t expect that any one of these digital solutions will provide a “magic bullet” tool for poverty alleviation, these tools support communities as they work to improve their lives and reach their goals.

A Fundacíon Capital family in their shop Photo credit: Fundacíon Capital

A Fundacíon Capital family in their shop
Photo credit: Fundacíon Capital

The only way to ensure that innovation and technology works is by both designing and testing it with the community and then learning from failures and making the necessary adaptations. For us, it is also important to learn from and share ideas with the social innovation community, so we look forward to working in partnership with other members of the community.

Fundación Capital made a Campaign Commitment to end extreme poverty, watch this video to know more about it:

 

Is it April Fools’ Day, or ‘Groundhog Day’?

Pathways: financial inclusion to end extreme poverty | Find out what we heard from the industry in this year’s Listening Tour

We’ll be bringing you articles throughout April that reflect the results of this year’s Listening Tour Photo credit: by Geoff (originally posted to Flickr as Pilgrim’s path) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


>>Authored by Larry Reed, Director, Microcredit Summit Campaign

MoMF

April is the Month of Microfinance

We are capitalizing on the occasion of the Month of Microfinance to bring you articles throughout April on our 100 Million Ideas blog that reflect the results of this year’s Listening Tour. We received written feedback from 151 people and conducted 27 interviews with thought leaders like Beth Porter (UNCDF), Syed Hashemi (BRAC University), Essma Ben Hamida (enda inter arabe), and William Derban (Fidelity Bank). This feedback from the industry forms the basis of the Campaign’s theme for 2015 of financial inclusion to end extreme poverty and the six pathways that we think show promise in getting us there:

  • Mobile money linked with agent networks in low-income communities;
  • Agricultural value chains that reach to small scale producers;
  • Savings groups (aka village savings and loans associations);
  • Conditional cash transfers linked with mobile delivery and asset building;
  • Ultra-poor graduation programs; and
  • Microfinance savings and/or borrowing groups linked with health education, health financing, and health product delivery.

These six pathways will be reflected in the 2015 State of the Campaign Report, the 18th Microcredit Summit, and Campaign Commitments to be featured this year. From the start, the Microcredit Summit Campaign has advocated scaling up microcredit (and, by extension, “microfinance”) as just one part of a larger effort to end poverty. We have held up as paramount the continued innovation and client-focused development of financial tools, creative ideas for delivering these services to remote and hard-to-reach areas at affordable prices, and the promise that microfinance can help create positive and durable changes in the lives of those being served. These six pathways are a continuation of that promise.

Fazila Begum struggling Member of Grameen Bank Shakhaerchar branch

We met Fazila Begum in 2007. She was a struggling member of Grameen Bank, Shakhaerchar branch.

When will researchers catch up with microfinance leaders?

From the very first loan of $27 that Mohammad Yunus gave to 42 women in Bangladesh, the heart of microfinance has always been about getting to know the needs of people living in poverty and designing products and services that help them loose the bonds that keep them in poverty. The aim of Yunus and many other founders of the movement was not to build financial institutions, but to empower people women to create a better future for themselves and their children. To do this they had to get to know people living in poverty and their cash flows, needs and aspirations in order to develop combinations of helpful products and services.

So when our team listened to the presentations of academic researchers made at the World Bank covering six randomized control trials of microcredit programs, we came away more than a little underwhelmed. Their big conclusion, after spending several years and millions of dollars on research: “Understand clients.” (Watch a recording of the forum.)

Even more alarming was that many of the researchers and the audience seemed surprised by the news. We have been engaged with leading microfinance groups around the world and have seen how they have learned — on their own — the lessons that the researchers presented as well as how they adapted their programs to address them long ago.

Here are some examples of research findings presented at the World Bank gatherings and actions previously taken by leading MFIs:

“Credit alone, on average, has neither large positive or negative effects.”

Very few of the leading MFIs that have focused on reaching people in poverty and facilitating their movement out of poverty have ever offered only credit. Grameen, from the start, had group savings and the 16 Decisions. The Village Banks developed by FINCA offered group savings and a group insurance fund. Many also provide training in business, marketing, health, nutrition, and sanitation in their group meetings.

“When only credit is available, people may use it when what they really need is savings, or insurance or other financial products.”

Microfinance leader BRI in Indonesia has been offering individual voluntary savings accounts since the 1980s and now has over 35 million savings accounts and 8 million borrowers. While many of the group lending systems provided loans, savings, and insurance bundled into one package, many of the leading MFIs have begun unbundling those services in the last two decades.

Grameen II, instituted in 2001, provides a range of financial services to clients, including voluntary savings and micropensions, and it removed the group guarantee on loans. Opportunity International began providing microinsurance in 2002, expanding from life insurance to health, casualty, and crop insurance and then spinning off MicroEnsure as a subsidiary that now reaches over 10 million clients.

Nangolkot, Noakhali, Bangladesh

Villagers in Nangolkot, Noakhali, Bangladesh
Photo credit: ©Shamimur Rahman and Giorgia Bonaga

“For 5-10 percent of the clients, credit has a very large positive impact on business growth and income.”

Aris Alip, founder of the CARD network of mutually reinforcing development institutions, saw this happening in the villages where CARD provided group-based savings and lending services. He also saw that those 5-10 percent that grew benefited the community by providing stable employment to others. In 2008, CARD created an SME bank to work specifically with fast growing microbusinesses and to see if, by providing appropriate products and services to this group, they could increase the percentage of growing businesses to 15 or 20 percent.

“For the ultra-poor, a gift of an asset has significant positive impact.”

REST Client photo_427x569

A woman client of Relief Society of Tigray (REST) in Ethiopia harvests her mango tree.
Photo credit: REST

This learning came directly from the work of BRAC and its ultra-poor graduation program. BRAC found that those who live on less than $.50 per day face so much vulnerability in their lives that they do not want to take on more debt. They developed a system of regular stipends of food or cash, a gift of an asset like an animal or a sewing machine, business training, savings, and regular mentoring. This program has now been replicated in several countries, and studies of these programs show strong positive impact.

The Relief Society of Tigray (REST) has combined this programs with the government’s Productive Safety Net Program so that the government provides the stipends and the assets, REST provides training and mentoring, and Dedebit Bank provides savings and lending facilities.


We are glad that these studies have proven out the innovations implemented by many leading MFIs. But if researchers want to get ahead of the learning curve, they could start to engage with some of these leading institutions on the questions that they are asking now. Here are some suggestions we have for new areas of research:

Research question 1: Conditional cash transfers (CCTs) seem to play an important role in providing some regularity in lives that are filled with unpredictability and vulnerability. How can these be linked with other services, like savings and insurance, to help beneficiaries move from resilience to asset building?

Research question 2: Are there some financial services that consistently provide benefits and rarely cause harmful effects so that they should be recommended for all? It looks like savings could fit this category, provided the savings mechanism is safe and the account maintains its value over time.

Research question 3: How do we refine our understanding of the situations in which credit is most likely to be helpful? And, what role do other services, such as group meetings, access to health care, insurance, and savings, improve the likelihood that a person will benefit from credit?

Research question 4: Graduation programs that start with a donated asset, group meetings, mentoring, and community involvement and lead to other financial service like savings and credit have proven to have a positive impact. Can we start to determine under what circumstances a person will need all of these services — and which people might need only one or two — to start moving from extreme poverty?

Instead of taking more time and money to prove that we need to understand clients, we suggest that researchers work with microfinance institutions that already listen to their clients and develop with them research agendas based on that growing understanding.

The same family from the top of the article has gone through the Stoplight process and now their situation is much improved.

A Fundación Paraguaya family has gone through the Poverty Stoplight process and now their situation is much improved. Read our blog post about the Poverty Stoplight.
Photo credit: Fundación Paraguaya


Relevant Resources

2013 State of the Campaign Report:Know Your Client

Social protection: innovative programs deliver financial services at scale

How families are creating step-by-step plans for poverty elimination


 

A few key takeaways from the World Bank forum on microcredit (video)

The diagnosis of the six randomized evaluations that spanned six countries on four continents, in both urban and rural areas with different borrower, lender, and loan characteristics, was that they showed no significant impact on the poverty level or living standards of the clients.

In some studies, it was concluded that the top 5-10 percent of clients did have some significant impact on their income and assets. One study showed some positive impact on women’s empowerment while another showed that depression seemed to go down for clients who had taken a loan, but their stress levels went up. Basically, it was all rather inconclusive, yet it also opened a transformative dialogue about how we can learn from our mistakes and what we need to do better to meet the needs of our clients.

On learning from what we know does work

The results of the randomized evaluations suggest that microcredit alone doesn’t have a transformative effect on the poor. However, despite its shortcomings, it is recognized that microcredit enhances the range of choices available to the poor and allows them to manage their circumstances as they consider appropriate.

Furthermore, microcredit still serves, in many cases, an important role as a risk absorption tool, acting as an insurance product that allows the clients to react to shocks and emergencies. In these instances, credit provides stability and prevents the clients from falling deeper into poverty. It has long been recognized that credit is not suited for many people, so insurance products should not be built around a credit product. In fact, several panelists said that microinsurance may be more needed than microloans particularly in sub-Saharan Africa,

For his part, Alex Counts (Grameen Foundation) invited the audience to focus on the five percent of clients — equivalent to millions of families — who moved out of poverty with microcredit. We should do this because we should want to understand (isn’t it our job to understand?) what it was that helped them compared to those less successful (or unsuccessful).

More research is needed to stimulate this conversation around what is working and what is not and to promote models that can serve as examples for adaptation and replication.

On understanding your clients

The research presented at the World Bank forum showed us that we need further analysis on what poor people really want and in understanding the heterogeneity of needs. It is important to study the particular context of each country, region, and community. Different circumstances lead to heterogeneous needs, so we need to offer a variety of products and services that actually meet the specific needs of the clients.

In addition, we need much more work on tracking how the money is being used. Perhaps we should not only look at factors like change in profits, wages, or consumption to test the success of microcredit products. Clients sometimes use their loan for personal needs, like for health issues or for social obligations such as weddings and funerals, and in order to see the impact of microcredit on the overall quality of life for clients, we need to know where the money is going.

Knowing more about these two dimensions will enable better product design, promote innovation, and help microfinance evolve in a manner that is both sustainable and beneficial to the extreme poor. It comes back to what Dean Karlan said, “Understand your clients.”

On the implications of digital innovations

Innovations in financial technologies are increasing client outreach and reducing transaction costs (to nearly zero), but they are also creating new transparency challenges that could pose serious risks to the clients if they are not addressed.

The main concern is the lack of adequate regulation for digital financial services. Client protection measures need to be in place to raise awareness of the risks linked to loans and ensure that customers understand the terms and conditions of the loans they are taking out. This is particularly important when we consider the rapid pace of growth and expected outreach of the new digital services.

When looking at agent networks, serving 100,000 clients after five years was a big achievement; today, however, they are expected to reach 1,000,000 clients after only one year of implementing a digital service.

We need to carefully assess the risk of inflicting harm to a large number of people at the base of the pyramid to ensure that digital financial services are being provided in a responsible way that brings no harm to the clients. Keeping this in mind may inspire innovative ideas for consumer protection and improve the quality of existing products.

On their recommendations for further research

In the coming years, Abhijit Banerjee (J-PAL) stated that research should focus on answering the questions: Why is there a low demand for microcredit products? What do clients need? What are the right products to offer them and the right channels? Where does the money go if it doesn’t reduce poverty?

Esther Duflo talked specifically about the graduation pilot programs, which are targeting the ultra-poor and already show some positive results on poverty levels. The results of this research will buoy efforts to promote the adoption of graduation programs as a poverty alleviation tool and underscores the need to segment the poor for the purposes of understanding the impact of microcredit and designing adequate products.

Are we measuring the real story? Jaikishan Desai, one of the researchers of the RCTs, posed this question to the audience. This seemed to go beyond how do we interpret the data to what is the purpose of measuring the impact of microcredit? Is microcredit and microfinance supposed to be the cure of the world poor or should it be used as a tool to include ignored segments of the population and reduce risk to those most vulnerable? Are we looking for a change in poverty levels or should we be focusing on the impact credit has on maintaining stability?

Other questions that were not resolved included, was the length of the study a factor? Do we need more long-term or short-term assessments? What about the generational impact? Could it be that we won’t see the effects of microcredit on clients unless we track progress through the next generation?

What impact does an MFI’s staff incentives and governance have on its clients? Does this impact the type of loans they receive and the quality of the product?

Relevant resources


For those who are unfamiliar with the cultural references in the title

April Fools’ Day: April 1st is a day of pranks and practical jokes and has its roots in medieval Europe — or possibly even earlier — and is similar to (or may be related to) the Holi festival of India.

Groundhog Day: February 2nd is an American tradition brought over by our German ancestors and adopted by popular culture and the media; it consists of looking to a rodent (a groundhog) to find out if winter is over or not. However, our reference here refers to a fantastic movie of the same name where Bill Murray relives the same day over and over again to hilarious effect.

New Partnerships against Poverty: Health and Financial Services

Gallery

This gallery contains 4 photos.

When hundreds of millions of women like Alpana can enjoy health, savings, good work, and a sense of achievement and security for their families, we will know that our job is done EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Sign onto the Declaration in Support of the Independence of Grameen Bank

Gallery

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Please join us and other allies of Grameen Bank in endorsing the Grameen Declaration EspañolFrançais Continue reading

A Declaration in Support of the Independence of Grameen Bank

Larry Reed calls on delegates to endorse the statement of support for Grameen Bank at the 2013 Partnerships against Poverty Summit in Manila, Philippines.

Larry Reed calls on delegates to endorse the statement of support for Grameen Bank at the 2013 Partnerships against Poverty Summit in Manila, Philippines.

In the mid-1970s, Professor Muhammad Yunus launched microfinance movement, starting with just $27 out of his own pocket he loaned to 42 poor weavers and merchants in Bangladesh. Today, Grameen Bank has grown to nearly 8.4 million members—nearly 97 percent of whom are women—and has lent over $12.5 billion, allowing millions of women and their families the opportunity to lift themselves out of severe poverty. Furthermore, ownership and leadership of this great institution lies in the hands of its women borrowers as 97 percent of its shareholders and 9 of 13 members of the board of directors are women borrowers. Its groundbreaking model has now been replicated in almost all countries around the world and has influenced the work of Summit delegates here today and Campaign members around the world, becoming a highly regarded institution in its nearly 40 years of operation.

Since 2010, the government of Bangladesh has threatened to take control of the bank. This move would undermine Grameen Bank’s longtime success, disenfranchise the women who own a majority of the shares—and, by virtue of that, a majority of its board seats—and even the independence of civil society throughout the country and microfinance institutions around the world. At the 2013 Partnerships against Poverty Summit just held in Manila, Philippines, Microcredit Summit Campaign Director Larry Reed called on delegates to endorse the following declaration of support for the beleaguered institution.

As delegates of the Microcredit Summit Campaign’s 2013 Partnerships against Poverty Summit, we voice our support for the continued independence of Grameen Bank and continued enfranchisement of the women who are the Bank’s clients and owners. It is imperative that the Grameen Bank Ordinance not be changed any further and that recent amendments be rescinded. This includes ensuring that the borrowers retain control of the bank and that the existing election process of the Board of Directors continue. We will continue to track this issue closely and remain vigilant in our support of Grameen Bank’s independence.

As delegates of this Summit, we are working together to guarantee that microfinance remains a tool that can be used by people in poverty to improve their lives and provide a pathway out of poverty. The takeover of an institution so admired as Grameen Bank is threat to all of us. The independence and integrity of microfinance and all of our institutions must be protected. Thus, it is our duty to speak out in solidarity with the women borrowers of Grameen Bank who, through their hard work, investments, and ownership of this bank, have empowered themselves and transformed the lives of their families. This threat to Grameen Bank is a threat to the progress of the microfinance sector not only in Bangladesh, but around the world.

More than 800 delegates, representing 145 institutions and 71 countries from every continent save Antarctica were present for the reading of this declaration. All were credited for their work to end extreme poverty and create economic opportunity for people worldwide. The declaration was met with a standing ovation from delegates in a resound display of support and adoption of the statement by the 2013 Partnerships against Poverty Summit.

Reflections from the 2013 Summit: An Interview with the “Father of Microfinance” – Dr. Yunus

The much anticipated talk with Dr. Yunus was the key highlight of the opening session at the Partnerships against Poverty 2013. Dr. Yunus began microfinance in Bangladesh around 37 years back, starting initially as a lender to the poor, then becoming a guarantor to enable the poor to borrow from banks, and then finally setting up an institution to provide access to finance to the poor. Dr Yunus shared that, in his experience, women were better borrowers for credit but the microfinance-women nexus is something he had to try hard to forge. In the beginning, his aim was to service at least 50% women but even getting to 50% was a daunting task- it took Grameen Bank 6 years to achieve this milestone. Today, 97% of Grameen Bank clients are women. Dr Yunus shared that when women borrowed there was a greater impact on household development as compared to when men borrowed money. Moreover, as women were more focused on ensuring that their children develop, they invested much more on their future. Dr. Yunus believes that the success the women borrowers of Grameen Bank have played a major role in the success of Grameen Bank.

Dr. Yunus stressed on the importance of creating entrepreneurs and said that the inability to create entrepreneurs is one of the biggest failings of the conventional financial service providers. He shared that all human beings are entrepreneurs but the role of the MFIs is to help clients unleash that entrepreneur that exists within themselves. Moreover, Dr. Yunus shared the concept of the social businesses, which according to him are non-dividend companies set up to solve human problems using creative capacity to address the problems being addressed. He shared that youth unemployment is a big problem in Bangladesh (as in many other parts of the world) but it can be addressed through social business – he shared the concept of the Youth Entrepreneur Fund which launches the youth into entrepreneurship. The entrepreneur gets an interest free loan which he/she has to return in 3 years. He said the basic difference between a social business and philanthropy is that in the former the money comes back while in the latter money doesn’t come back. Dr Yunus further added that being able to catalyze change is the biggest benefit of social businesses – while making money makes you happy, making others happy makes you ‘superhappy’.

Dr Yunus ended his talk with the message that “we will make it”, he was referring primarily to the Millennium Development Goals (MGDs). He shared with a lot of pride that Bangladesh had actually halved poverty in 2013 (2 years before the deadline for the 1st MGD), and is poised to meet all 8 MGDs by the year 2015. He said that Bangladesh had been deemed a ‘basket case’, but if Bangladesh can do it so can other countries! He urged all delegates to ensure that 2015 ends with meeting the MGDs!

Larry Reed’s Letter to the Editor: Microcredit in Bangladesh

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.

Sheikh Hasina would be better served by finding creative ways to partner with Grameen Bank–like other governments have learned how to do. EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Grameen Bank Commission of Inquiry Interim Report: 9 Borrower Directors Should Step Down

Gallery

Bangladesh has made impressive strides in health, education, and poverty reduction over the past few decades. For instance, since 1990, child morality fell by two-thirds. These gains were made possible because a vibrant, effective civil society, in particular, microfinance providers … Continue reading

Signez notre pétition de soutien envers Grameen Bank

Soutenez les femmes de Grameen pour empêcher une violation de leurs droits

La Campagne du Sommet du Microcrédit soutient une pétition sur le site Change.org pour avertir la Premier Ministre du Bangladesh Sheikh Hasina que les actions continues de son gouvernement à l’encontre de l’indépendance de Grameen Bank sont inacceptables. Après le renvoi de Pr. Muhammad Yunus du poste de directeur général l’année dernière, il est clair que le gouvernement cherche à un éventuel rival politique et à s’approprier pour un usage personnel les ressources de Grameen Bank et des entreprises sociales Grameen.

La Campagne n’est pas seule à mener cette action : Vidar Jorgensen de Grameen America, Sam Daley-Harris du Center for Citizen Empowerment and Transformation, Joanne Carter de RESULTS et RESULTS Educational Fund, Asad Mahmood, et bien d’autres se tiennent à nos cotés.

Signez la pétition: http://mcs2015.org/GBpetition_fr

Quelle est la situation?

L’indépendance de Grameen Bank et les parts détenues par ses femmes-clientes sont aujourd’hui menacées par le gouvernement dirigé par Sheikh Hasina, la Premier Ministre de Bangladesh. Ces dernières années, Mme Hasina a mené une initiative avec son gouvernement pour forcer le Professeur Yunus à quitter son poste de directeur général de la banque. Le gouvernement a maintenant nommé une commission pour examiner les opérations de Grameen Bank et effectuer des recommandations sur sa future direction. Cette commission est considérée par une large majorité comme une tentative du gouvernement de prendre le contrôle de Grameen Bank aux femmes emprunteuses et clientes.

Quelles sont les conséquences pour vous?

Il ne s’agit pas uniquement de Grameen. Il s’agit de l’autonomie des organisations de microfinance et des institutions de la société civile dans tous les pays du monde.

Nous vous exhortons à signer la pétition et à la partager avec votre communauté et vos contacts pour démontrer que la communauté de la  microfinance défendra tous ceux qui sont menacés ainsi. Ces stratégies ne sont pas propres au Bangladesh et la prise de contrôle par le gouvernement du Bangladesh d’une des plus grandes institutions de microfinance dans le monde (8,3 millions de clients) créerait un dangereux précédent.
C’est également un problème de droits humains.

Grameen Bank a longtemps été leader, non seulement en microfinance et réduction de la pauvreté, mais également en matière d’autonomisation des femmes pauvres vivant en milieu rural au Bangladesh. Son modèle a souvent été imité à travers le monde. Les femmes constituent 97% des emprunteurs de Grameen Bank, détiennent 95% des capitaux propres de la banque, et sont représentées par 9 des 13 membres du conseil d’administration. Ces femmes-propriétaires partagent le Prix Nobel de la Paix remis en 2006 à Grameen Bank et à son fondateur, Muhammad Yunus. Toute intervention supplémentaire du gouvernement sur l’autorité du Conseil d’administration de Grameen Bank serait donc un énorme revers pour les droits humains et les droits légaux de ces femmes.
Ce que vous pouvez faire.

La commission nommée par le gouvernement du Bangladesh rendra ses recommandations sur l’avenir de Grameen Bank dans moins de deux mois. Nous devons donc utiliser tous les outils à notre disposition pour exhorter la premier ministre Hasina à protéger l’indépendance de Grameen Bank et de ses emprunteurs.

  1. Signez la pétition avant le 17 août : http://mcs2015.org/GBpetition_fr
  2. Faites passer l’information autour de vous en envoyant ce message par email, en le postant sur votre page Twitter, Facebook, et votre groupe LinkedIn. (Une fois que vous avez signé la pétition vous pouvez également la partager sur vos réseaux sociaux).
  3. Utilisez le hashtag #SaveGrameen.
  4. Pour appuyer officiellement la pétition, contactez Sabina Rogers par email à rogers@microcreditsummit.org.

Grameen Bank Model Expanded to Mexico with the $45 Million Grameen Carso Microfinance Program

Grameen Bank has been shaped in 1983, in Bangladesh, by Professor Muhammad Yunus who has been a pioneer in the microcredit field and who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006. Today Grameen Bank provides loans to almost 8 million borrowers across Bangladesh. Moreover, in 1989, Mr. Yunus expanded the Grameen Bank model to other countries as he created the Grameen Trust.

Lately, Grameen Trust has joined hands with Fundacion Carlos Slim (family charity of Carlos Slim, 3rd wealthiest man in the world – as per Forbes) to create Grameen Carso. As a recent article reveals “The mission of Grameen Carso is to significantly increase access to affordable micro-credit in Mexico for poverty alleviation through the Grameen Bank microcredit model and the support of Foundation Carlos Slim. Grameen Carso plans to serve more than 100,000 borrowers in the first five years.”