The 2015 State of the Campaign Report in a nutshell

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.

An African farmer is linked into the financial system via her mobile phone.
In his presentation today at the Inclusive Finance India Summit New Delhi, Larry Reed featured Mapping Pathways out of Poverty: The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report, 2015. The report is now available online. We will also publish the full report in French, Spanish, and Arabic in early 2016. You can also read previous reports online, just select the year of interest from the drop-down menu “Previous Reports.”

At our 2013 Microcredit Summit in the Philippines, we focused on the partnerships required to deliver financial services to those living in poverty. At our 2014 Summit in Mexico, we focused on innovations in microfinance with a demonstrated capacity to reach those in extreme poverty. This year, we use the report to explore, in more detail, our six financial “pathways.” Each pathways has a chapter, and each chapter does the following:

Español | Français | Continue reading

Getting the ultra-poor on the “economy train”

BRAC group meeting

BRAC group meeting

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


>>Authored by Yanira Garcia and Sabina Rogers of the Microcredit Summit Campaign

More than one-fifth of the world’s population lives on less than US$1.25 per day (the “extreme poor”), and most of those people live in rural areas. Due mostly to geographic constraints, it is difficult and costly to reach this population with financial and social services. Having poor infrastructure and few tools, they are stuck in a perpetual cycle of poverty.

This is a problem just begging for a solution. How about six financial inclusion strategies — our “six pathways” — that show promise in ending extreme poverty? Specifically, how about BRAC’s Graduation Approach? In 2002, BRAC set out to help the ultra-poor living on less than 80 cents a day to move up one level of poverty and to develop an approach that could tackle the geography obstacle. (Read Shameran Abed’s blog post to learn how BRAC developed Graduation Approach.)

Exciting results from impact assessments

In June, Science magazine published the results of six randomized controlled trial (RCT) impact assessments of BRAC’s Graduation Approach. The RCTs were conducted in Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras, India, Pakistan, and Peru among 7000 households and provided the following complementary approaches:

  • Productive assets
  • Training and regular coaching and household visits
  • Access to savings and health services
  • Consumption support

At a half-day event in June at the World Bank, “Creating Sustainable Livelihoods for the Poorest,” the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP), Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA), and J-PAL disclosed results from these six RCTs.

The RCTs showed that the Graduation Approach is a cost-effective, clear pathway out of poverty. Specifically, attendees learned that it can help drive a sustainable transition to self-employment and ultimately have large lasting impacts on the standard of living of the ultra-poor. “There will be growth in the economy,” stated Esther Duflo, “and the ultra-poor are not on the [economy] ‘train’ and would never get on the train [without help]…The Graduation Approach would push them onto the train.” (Dr. Duflo is co-director of J-Pal and professor of economics at MIT.)

Eligible households were identified through a participatory wealth ranking process as well as through household visits. On average, participant households had higher incomes, increased savings, greater food security, and improved health and happiness. These effects were consistent across multiple contexts and implementing partners.

Additional outcomes from the study include the following:

  • Daily consumption was not negatively affected over time in the selected sites after the program had ended. The authors suggest increased consumption is a result of increasing self-employment activity.
  • Household members were able to afford two meals per day more often.
  • Households continued to increase their productive assets (most in the form of livestock) as well as their savings after the program had ended, with the exception of Honduras. (Participating households in Honduras suffered an unexpected illness that killed all of the chickens, causing the study to be incomplete.)
  • In Bangladesh, where women were targeted, land ownership increased by 38 percent.

The Graduation Approach had the largest impact on ultra-poor households in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, and India. Researchers suggest that income diversification may have been a leading factor. In addition, cost-benefit calculations confirm that long-run benefits for the ultra-poor outweigh the graduation program’s overall cost.

Policy lessons for scale-up and replication

The RCTs also provide us with important policy lessons for scale-up:

  • For the Graduation Approach to have a lasting impact on ending extreme poverty, the support and action of governments and policymakers is essential.
  • It is possible to make sustainable improvements in the economic status of the poor with a relatively short-term intervention.
  • The positive results to date indicate that this approach can have a profound impact on improving the lives of the world’s ultra-poor.

Scale-up of the Graduation Approach is underway and will reach thousands of households in the coming years. Mariana Escobar, deputy director general for the Department for Social Prosperity in Colombia, spoke about Colombia’s pilot that started two years ago.

In Colombia, the Graduation Approach has helped repair the lives of the victims of the internal conflict and victims of sexual violence. Ms. Escobar explained that these results demonstrate to policymakers and governments that the extreme poor can make good economic decisions when they are given the right tools.

Edgar Leiva (Secretary of Technical Planning, Directory of Public Policies for Paraguay), Hugo Zertuche Guerrero (Director General of Geostatistical Information of PROSPERA in Mexico), Camilla Holmeno (Senior Economist with the World Bank in Ethiopia), and Fiona Howell (Senior Social Assistance Policy Advisor with the National Team For the Acceleration of Poverty Reduction in Indonesia) shared their respective country’s perspective on the Graduation Approach. On a scale of low to high, policymakers were asked to answer the questions below.

Q: How high was the impact evidence to decide to start a program in your respective country?

A: All of the policymakers answered “high.”

Q: How influential was visiting the site and seeing it in person to starting a program?

A: All of the policymakers answered “high.” Edgar Leiva (Paraguay) explained that his government started a pilot program two days after visiting Colombia’s pilot program.

Q: What was each country’s biggest challenge in implementing the program?

A:

  • Camilla Holmeno (Ethiopia): both cost and complexity.
  • Edgar Leiva (Paraguay): maintaining the positive attitude of workers in the program, which helps create a sort of magic and is so important to the success of the program.
  • Hugo Zertuche (Mexico): budget constraints due to recent decrease in oil prices as well as cross-program competition (and a perception that Zertuche’s program was poaching resources from other programs).
  • Fiona Howell (Indonesia): existing structures and system and coordination among the Ministries.

Q: What is the number one research question you would like to know the answer to?

A:

  • Camilla Holmeno (Ethiopia): test different types of packages with varying levels of transfer across Ethiopia.
  • Edgar Leiva (Paraguay): how closely tied the Graduation Approach is to the psychology of people.
  • Fiona Howell (Indonesia): how we can integrate the urbanized poor into the economic system.

Additional questions for future research were posed in the closing section of the event:

  • Which components of the Graduation Approach drive results? Through this study, CGAP and Ford Foundation learned that household visits allotted for 30 percent of the cost of the program. Are household visits necessary?
  • How do the impacts of the Graduation Approach evolve over a longer time span?

Watch the event recording

Related reading

#tbt: Microfinance Revolution at the Very Bottom

#Tbt_6

Keynote speakers of the 2004 Microcredit Summit in Bangladesh. Begum Khaleda Zia, then Prime Minister of Bangladesh, was the “chief guest.”

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


We are pleased to bring you this #ThursdayThrowback blog post, which was originally published in The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report 2007. We hope this will encourage you to reflect on both how long we have been fighting to convince the policy makers (and other doubters) that microfinance can reach the extreme poor as well as be inspired by our early revolutionaries.


Microfinance Revolution at the Very Bottom: A Radical Departure

The following is an excerpt from an interview Campaign Director Sam Daley-Harris conducted with Jamii Bora founder Ingrid Munro in October 2007.

April is the Month of MicrofinanceLearn more

April is the Month of Microfinance
Learn more

Microcredit Summit Campaign: RESULTS volunteers in the United States and in other countries have been working for four years to get half of World Bank microfinance funds to those living on less than a dollar a day. The arguments that come from the World Bank and others is that you cannot reach the very poor with microfinance, they need safety nets first. The president of the World Bank said this in an October 2007 meeting with 29 members of the U.S. Congress. Do you agree with this position?

Ingrid Munro: I don’t agree with that at all, because in Jamii Bora we know that you can reach the very poor. Not just reach them, not just feel sorry for them, pat them on the head and say, we are going to help you to come above the poverty line…

Our experience is, first of all, the most desperate are the ones that need microfinance the most, and they can handle it, we have proven that. It’s not something that is a theory, it is a proven fact…The poorer they are, the more they need the microfinance. And, they don’t need charity because charity is a way to keep people down. If we keep saying, “I feel very sorry for you because you can’t manage this yourself,” you start thinking [to yourself], “I should feel sorry for [myself] because I can’t manage [on my own].”

But, if we say to you, “You can make it. You have talents. God has given you talents like He has given everybody talents, and He wants you to use them.” And [if] you see some of your friends who were begging beside you on the same street now walk around in nice dresses, their children are in school, they eat three meals a day, they live in a better house — then you also dare to dream that that is possible for [you too].

Microcredit Summit Campaign: You say that some groups have tried to do what you do in reaching the very poor, but they get their fingers burned. What are some of the principles that can allow microfinance to succeed when you work with beggars, landless laborers, and prostitutes?

Ingrid Munro: …You have to be very close. You see, the beggar is a professional, it is a profession in itself. So, if you come and give a beggar $100, and say, “You go and start a business,” they will run away with that money. You have to prepare everybody for what it is, and we think you have to start by getting them to save, because then they are in that habit of setting aside a bit of money every day. That makes it easy for them to pay back the loan.

You also have to be there and encourage them when the problems come. The city authorities chase you away from where you are doing your business. A police officer might even take your goods, or thieves break in to your little kiosk, or you have a fire that [burns] down everything. You can’t be like a normal bank and say, “Okay, we will still hunt you. You have to bring the money back.” [Instead] you come together and say, “Now how do we solve this situation?” And you help them get on their feet so they are helped to pay back the old loan, but also a new loan. It’s a matter of being there all the time and understanding.

If you are naïve and you just go up to somebody who you haven’t spoken to about a loan, who doesn’t know [your] group, who doesn’t trust you…and you say, “Here’s $100, go start a business,” then you will lose that money. And there are naïve people who do that, and I think those are the ones who are spreading this dangerous message that you can’t reach the very poor, because they’ve done it the wrong way themselves, not because you can’t reach the very poor. I invite anyone who doubts to come visit us…

In that sense I think we are a movement, a people’s own movement, more than we are an institution, a normal financial institution. But we’re still microfinance.

Microcredit Summit Campaign: There are so many different things that Jamii Bora does from housing to the “get sober” program. Please talk about another of your innovative offerings, health insurance. How did it come about, what does it costs, and what are the benefits?

Ingrid Munro: In early 2001 we were one year and a few months old. We realized we had some people who were…falling behind in their repayments. So we decided to make a hundred percent research. We would visit every single one of them with our staff and try to note down what are [their] problems. Why can you not pay?

It was such a shocking result. We found that 93 percent had the same problem, they had a patient in hospital…It means my son, my daughter, my baby, my grandchild, or my spouse, or my sister — somebody very close to [them] had to be admitted in hospital, otherwise they would die. Now, of course, you can’t expect that anyone will let their child die because they have to pay their loan to Jamii Bora. So, it was clear to us, this was something we could not compete with. This was something that we had to solve.

So we went to all the insurance companies and asked, “Could you develop an insurance product for us?” They said, “Oh yes, yes.”

We had 6,000 members in those days, and they thought that was a lot. But the cheapest they could come up with was 6,000 shillings, and 6,000 shillings is about US$80 per year. And, US$80 per year, if you are a single mother with five children, you see, you have to [multiply that] times six. That is a lot of money. That is way above what anyone could dream of.

We then decided we’ll start our own in-house product. Everyone told me, “Now Ingrid, you are killing this beautiful organization. This will pull you down. It will not work.” But we never did any research. We sat in a group of staff with a lot of knowledge about our members. We decided we could charge 1,000 shillings a year, which was US$12 at the time, on condition that the members could pay every week, a small amount (about 30 cents US), and they didn’t have to pay everything up front. And, we decided it would cover an adult member and a maximum of four dependent kids. If they had more than four kids, they would add an extra US$2 per child per year. We would cover in-patient, that is, treatment in hospital. If they came into hospital, we would cover everything.

We started by linking up with one of the big mission hospitals in Nairobi. We said, “We’ll give you a deposit of what we think it could cost per month,” because mission hospitals cannot afford to give you services on credit. So we paid them up front. Then our members would come with a letter from us saying, “This patient has health insurance from us and please treat her. If she has to be admitted, we will pay everything.”

There was not more research than that. The background was, “This is what our members can afford to pay and we have to get it to work.” Over time, this has become a most incredible part of our organization. We also decided weren’t going to ask for any donor funding, because then they would send a lot of consultants and they’d tell us it’s not possible to do what we had decided to do, and they would also say, “So and so should qualify and those clients should not qualify.”

We wanted it to be for everybody. We decided it would cover maternity, it would cover any kind of operations, it would cover any kind of in-patient treatment, and we would not exclude people with HIV and AIDS, because then it was a useless insurance for us. And today, [October 2007] it is soon going to be seven years that we have run this.

We have always covered all our costs. We have never had any donor subsidy, not even US$1, and we have never asked for it either. I am sure we would have got it if we had asked. It has saved so many lives. Right now 120,000 people [are covered by the health insurance], because [every member of Jamii Bora] doesn’t take out health insurance…

Relevant resources

Problems with scaling technological innovations

Gallery

This gallery contains 1 photo.

With water filtration systems, filters have to be regularly replaced. Because filters are often expensive or difficult to find since they are model-specific, donated home filtration systems go to waste. Continue reading

Institutional Action Plan Raffle Winner: Community Development Society Nagpur

Gallery

This gallery contains 6 photos.

Congratulations to this week’s winner of the Raffle for Institutional Action Plan Submitters, Community Development Society, Nagpur of India!EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Invitación al Evento Microfinanzas y Salud – 30 de Mayo – Lima, Perú

Gallery

This gallery contains 7 photos.

Tenemos el agrado de invitarles a participar en el lanzamiento del informe “Estado de la Práctica de la Integración de Salud en los Servicios de Microfinanzas en Bolivia, Ecuador y Perú”. El evento se llevará a cabo este 30 de mayo de 5pm a 7pm, en el Hotel Meliá en Lima. Continue reading

Help Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra restore eyesight to 1,000 villagers in India!

Gallery

This gallery contains 5 photos.

Nav Bharat Jagriti Kendra (NBJK), a member of the Microcredit Summit Campaign since 1998, is a non-profit organization operating in Jharkhand and Bihar states and was established by four engineering graduates in India in 1971. NBJK works with poor people … Continue reading