New database tool can help you define and refine client outcomes

Gallery

Global Health Indicators Project
The Microcredit Summit Campaign has long been committed to promoting the uptake of measurement tools in the microfinance sector, especially the poverty measurement tools. Such tools provide MFIs the means to know for sure if they really are reaching the poorest. More recently, we have encouraged MFIs to implement these tools to track the movement of clients (hopefully) out of poverty. At the 18th Microcredit Summit next month, we have several sessions that will show participants the benefits and challenges of such tools, including the Client Outcome Performance (COPE) Indicators Database, which you’ll read about here.


>> Authored by Bobbi Gray, Freedom from Hunger

When I joined Freedom from Hunger several years back, I had the responsibility to carry on a decades-long commitment to research and evaluation. My predecessor, Barbara MkNelly, as well as my then-supervisor and president of Freedom from Hunger, Christopher Dunford, were already known for their contributions to the research efforts of the growing microfinance sector and the original set of SEEP/AIMS client assessment tools. Freedom from Hunger’s commitment to promoting easy-to-use and cost-effective tools also led to years of developing monitoring and evaluation systems for microfinance organizations that were coined as “Progress Tracking.” Fast-forward several years, and this is much better known as Social Performance Management.

Español | Français | Continue reading

Ecuadorian Government commits to support entrepreneurs with disabilities

The Technical Secretariat provides financial inclusion support to entrepreneurial projects led by persons with disabilities. Says Alex Camacho Vásconez, Technical Secretary, “This commitment will allow us to take part in an international movement that seeks to reduce extreme poverty all over the world.” Read the full press release.

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes the Government of Ecuador as the first government to make a Campaign Commitment, joining a global coalition of 54 partner organizations working to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty.

The Technical Secretariat for the Inclusive Management on Disabilities (Secretaría Técnica de Discapacidades) of the Vice-presidency of the Republic of Ecuador is developing the “Productive & Financial Inclusion Model” through public-private partnerships. The model provides financial capacity building and training in support of enterprises run by persons with disabilities, and the Technical Secretariat has supported 257 enterprises to date. The Technical Secretariat commits to support 500 entrepreneurial projects led by persons with disabilities through the Productive & Financial Inclusion Network by December 31, 2015.

Furthermore, the Technical Secretariat understands the vital importance of measurement indicators to assess progress in meeting its objectives in serving persons with disabilities. It is currently working with partners to identify and assess the relative strengths of available poverty measurement and other indicators. The Technical Secretariat commits to implement a set of measurement indicators, including indicators to assess poverty levels, during the first half of 2015.

Alex Camacho Vásconez, explains why they have joined the Microcredit Summit Campaign and this global coalition:

“Our commitment to advise more than 500 entrepreneurs with disabilities in 2015 and to implement tools for the assessment of poverty levels of the members of this priority group directly supports the objectives of the 100 Million Project,” said Alex Camacho Vásconez, Technical Secretary. “The signature of this commitment will allow us to take part in an international movement that seeks to reduce extreme poverty all over the world. This strategic partnership with a global actor such as the Microcredit Summit Campaign is of great value as it constitutes a guarantee for the beneficiaries of the Productive Inclusion model and international recognition as a good practice for the global eradication of poverty.”

Read the Government of Ecuador’s Campaign Commitment letter.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign looks forward to welcoming our new partners to the global coalition and sharing their progress towards achievement of their Commitment at the 18th Microcredit Summit. The Campaign’s 100 Million Project is building a movement among financial service stakeholders committed to helping to end extreme poverty through: public statements of commitment to action, expanding practices to reliably measure movement out of extreme poverty, and promoting innovations and best practices to accelerate movement out of poverty.

The Technical Secretariat for the Inclusive Management on Disabilities was created in 2013 to coordinate the transfer of programs and projects from the Misión Solidaria Manuela Espejo to the guiding ministries; following Executive Directive No. 547, enacted January 14, 2015, this was transformed into the Technical Secretariat forthe Inclusive Management on Disabilities.

Among its roles are the coordination of  cross-sector implementation of public policy in matters concerning disabilities such as development and enactment of policy, plans, and programs to raise awareness about persons with disabilities within the initiative of Participatory and Productive Inclusion and Universal Access under the national program Ecuador Lives Inclusion (Programa Ecuador Vive la Inclusion).


We invite you to join the Government of Ecuador and…

Get Inspired. Set a Goal. Make a Commitment.

Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:

The importance of measuring client outcomes

Outcomes process

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


The World Bank is hosting a day-long event today (as I write this, actually) presenting lessons and implications of the latest research on microcredit. Based on the swiftness of my Twitter feed, the event, “Financial Services for the Poor: Lessons and Implications of the Latest Research on Credit,” is very popular and timely. (You can follow it using the hashtags #WBlive and #Microcredit2015.) Much of the evidence shared this morning (when they had a live video feed of the event), confirmed our understanding that microcredit alone is not enough.[1]

Indeed, the speakers in the 10 AM session (agenda), in response to an audience question, “If you had $1 million, how much of it would you put toward microfinance?”, recommended that we should invest our money in human capitol, namely early childhood education and conditional cash transfers (CCTs).

We would add health-related products and services: from health education for positive behavior change to healthcare delivery, and everything in between. We also believe that it is essential to measure and track the client outcomes of our interventions over time — be they microcredit, savings, insurance, or non-financial products and services.

On February 4th, the Social Performance Task Force (SPTF) Outcomes Working Group hosted a virtual meeting on the “Selection of Outcomes Indicators.” The purpose of this working group is to develop practical guidelines for credible measurement of and reporting on outcomes, drawing on experience with different approaches and tools.

Frances Sinha of EDA Rural Systems introduced the session and explain how theory of change connects to indicators. Bobbi Gray of Freedom from Hunger explained the criteria applied to developing outcomes indicators — including a new set of Health Outcome Performance Indicators (HOPI) in partnership with the Microcredit Summit Campaign — and lessons learned. Anne Hastings of the Microfinance CEO Working Group discussed their plans for laying the groundwork for a common measurement and monitoring system.

Feb 5th meeting resources

If you would like to learn more about the pros and cons of the Health Outcomes Performance Indicators, join us on March 4th with the SEEP Network’s HAMED Working Group for the webinar, “Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: How MFIs Can Track the Health of Clients.”


SPTF’s Outcomes Working Group will host a repeat of their December 14th virtual meeting on Tuesday, March 3rd at 4 AM (EST) // 9 AM (GMT) // 12 PM (East Africa) // 2:30 PM (India). Panelists will discuss the Theory of Change and how it helps us think about what to measure and when.

Recordings and materials from the original meeting (December 14th) are available online.

Speakers:

  • Frances Sinha, EDA Rural Systems
  • Anton Simanowitz, Independent consultant

The idea of a Theory of Change is now increasingly applied to strategic planning. It is beginning to be applied to measurement of change. This webinar will review the framework of a Theory of Change and to discuss how it can help an institution think through the ways in which it aims to achieve change, what inputs lead to what outcomes, and the time frame for expected change to take place. These are questions that are fundamental to appropriate research design and help in identifying relevant outcome indicators (short-term and long-term) and in analyzing the data to reflect a relevant sequence of inputs, outputs and outcomes.

About the Outcomes Working Group

  • Facilitator: Frances Sinha, director of EDA Rural Systems (India) and SPTF Board member.
  • Purpose: Develop practical guidelines for credible measurement of and reporting on outcomes, drawing on experience with different approaches and tools.
  • Introductory presentation

[1] Social Performance Task Force (SPTF) “Repeat session of the Outcomes Work Group: Theory of Change” WebEx meeting.

Tuesday, March 3, 2015 at 4:00 am | Eastern Standard Time (New York, GMT-05:00)

Click to join WebEx meeting
Meeting number: 315 311 993
Meeting password: sptf

Join by phone
1-877-668-4493 Call-in toll-free number (US/Canada)
1-650-479-3208 Call-in toll number (US/Canada)
Access code: 315 311 993

Global call-in numbers
Toll-free calling restrictions
Add this meeting to your calendar.