Free ultrasounds draw thousands to community health fairs

A doctor provides free checkups as part of a health outreach program in the Philippines. Photo by: CARD MRI

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World leaders are convening in New York this week to finalize the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, an ambitious plan that will build on the successes and tackle problems where the Millennium Development Goals fell short. Freedom from Hunger and the Microcredit Summit Campaign are partnering with CARD Mutually Reinforcing Institutions (CARD MRI) to implement an 18-month project to address one of these MDG achievement gaps: maternal health in the Philippines. The project, “Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies: Kalinga kay Inay,” is supported by an educational grant from Johnson & Johnson and will wrap up in December.

We have prepared a newsletter to let you know how things are going. To receive a copy of the newsletter, please sign up for our integrated health and microfinance news mailing list. Here is a sneak peek at the first issue of our Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies: Kalinga kay Inay Project Newsletter.


Charyle is 32 years old and nine months pregnant with her fourth child. She attended the Davao City community health fair organized in July by CARD MRI, a Philippine microfinance institution (MFI), with partners from the MFIs for Health consortium.

Charyle was very excited to get an ultrasound. While Charyle goes monthly to a nearby health center for prenatal checkups, this was likely her first ultrasound. Charyle plans to deliver at a birthing center (an affordable alternative to a hospital for low-risk pregnancies). “I like it [the birthing center] better because it’s more personal,” she said. “I have PhilHealth, which helps with costs and point-of-care service.”

CARD has made a point to engage the local health insurance office of the Philippines’ national health insurance program, PhilHealth, in the fairs. Many women do not know the benefits or financial savings of PhilHealth membership, such as the fact that a year’s premium is less than a typical uninsured delivery. So, they provide orientation, enrollment of non-members, and other services to health fair attendees.

Irish (27) is four months pregnant with her first child. She has visited a health clinic three times already and plans to deliver at a regional hospital because she has hypertension. “So,” said Irish, “I think I will look at PhilHealth while at this health fair.”

Barrera (30) is 8 months pregnant with her fourth child. Barrera learned of the fair during her prenatal visit at the health center, which is within walking distance and offers free prenatal checkups. She said she decided to come to the fair “For the ultrasound — to be able to see my baby. It was my first time.” Berrera also plans to deliver at her local birthing center. “It is walking distance from where I live, and it is PhilHealth accredited, so free.”

Charyle, Irish, and Barrera were among 435 women who attended the two fairs; however, they were not typical in their prenatal care and delivery plans. OB/GYNs, general physicians, pediatricians, and other medical professionals provided services to these women that many normally would not be able to access or afford. In the four health fairs held so far, some 3600 pregnant and lactating women have gotten a free check-up.

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What else is in the newsletter?

Increasing Healthcare Access

Through “Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies,” 8,000 women of child bearing age (primarily pregnant and lactating women) will receive education and preventive services through five community health fairs by the end of 2015. Women from the local community and surrounding areas access maternal health products and services like urine tests, OB/GYN consults, ultrasounds, sonograms, and vitamins provided by BotiCARD (part of the CARD family). Such services are otherwise unavailable them. The next health fair will be October 2-3 in rural communities in Mindanao. Contact Mharra de Mesa to learn more.

What’s in the Mother and Baby Kit?

health-kit_HMHB-PH_Oct2014_Courtesy-of-CARD-MRI

Building Capacity to Provide Health Education

What does it take to deliver maternal health education to 600,000 women? In January 2015, 17 CARD staff and 1 nurse took part in a training of trainers (ToT) on the maternal and child health education module, “Healthy Pregnancies Make Healthy Communities.” In March, four members of MFIs for Health — ASA Philippines Foundation Inc., KMBI, TSPI, and CCT — joined the Integration Workshop and ToT facilitated by CARD MRI. Learn how CARD is taking a leadership role in the Philippines to extend health products and services to more microfinance clients. Contact Cassie Chandler to learn more about the education module.

“MFIs for Health” Provide Health Services to Poor Communities

The Filipino “MFIs for Health” consortium expanded to 21 microfinance institutions (MFIs) in May when they inked a Memorandum of Agreement to provide access to health care services to poor communities. “The microfinance industry has grown so much over the past year,” Sen. Paulo Benigno “Bam” Aquino said. “It is crucial that the MFI industry should continue to innovate…and unlock more accessible opportunities that go beyond financing and bring it to our countrymen especially in the areas who have less opportunities.” Learn how the Filipino microfinance sector is mobilizing to improve the health of poor communities. Contact MAHPSecretariat@gmail.com to learn more.

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