Meet RESULTS, “one of the best-kept secrets in development”

Regular, everyday Americans at the halls of congress

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>>Authored by Sabina Rogers, Communications and Relationships Manager, Microcredit Summit Campaign

In a 2013 article, New York Times opinion writer, David Bornstein, wrote that RESULTS “remains one of the best-kept secrets in development.” RESULTS (and RESULTS Educational Fund, from which the Microcredit Summit came and into which the Microcredit Summit Campaign operations have been merged) is a grassroots advocacy organization founded in 1980. It has international affiliates in the UK, Canada, Australia, France (and Belgium), Japan, Korea, and Mexico; and the RESULTS family coordinates advocacy efforts to remarkable effect.

Never heard of RESULTS? Recall the poverty measurement legislation in the mid-2000s that requires USAID to direct at least 50 percent of their microenterprise funds to those living on less than $1 a day? Legislation that also prompted the creation of USAID’s Poverty Assessment Tool? That was RESULTS and allies.

The U.N. International Year of Microcredit in 2005 and the Nobel Peace Prize for Muhammad Yunus and Grameen Bank? That was RESULTS volunteers and the Microcredit Summit Campaign lobbying year after year for consideration. (FYI: The Year of Microcredit was established by the UN in 1998, the year after the 1997 Microcredit Summit, through the efforts of the Bangladesh Ambassador to the U.N., in recognition of the Summit’s 2005 deadline.)

Maternal and child legislation that would put the U.S. on track to help end preventable maternal and child deaths globally and ensure key reforms so every dollar we invest has greater impact? RESULTS has lobbied for maternal and child health funding year in and year out for 32 years, and child death rates have plummeted from 40,000 a day in 1984 to 16,000 a day today. More recently, RESULTS helped craft the Reach Every Mother and Child Act of 2015.

Pressuring Congress to preserve the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit (CTC), which are our country’s most successful anti-poverty programs for children? That was RESULTS.

Bornstein reported that World Bank President Jim Kim said, “RESULTS has such a lean and efficient model that nobody knows about them. They’re incredibly dedicated and very knowledgeable about the issues. It’s remarkable how much they’ve done and how few people have any idea about it.”

RESULTS (the 501(c)(4), non tax-deductible arm) and RESULTS Educational Fund (the 501(c)(3), tax-deductible arm) work hand-in-hand to produce cutting edge research to back up policy demands, which RESULTS volunteers take to Congress and other countries’ national parliaments, the World Bank, and bilateral donor agencies such as USAID to influence policy.

RESULTS takes on issues that are on the leading edge of policy and advocacy and brings them into the main stream.

Last year, RESULTS volunteers pushed Congress hard during the appropriations process and succeeded in reversing a total of $495 million in proposed cuts to global poverty focused programs and instead increased funding for these programs by $70 million. This in a political climate where partisanship is reaching its zenith and Congress is widely regarded as broken.

Citizens in the U.S. and all over the world have had a hand in making change through the RESULTS model for 35 years. RESULTS will soon be launching a new five-year strategic plan, and it will continue to advance an advocacy agenda in the financial inclusion space, helping to accelerate toward the end of extreme poverty by 2030.

As Larry Reed and Joanne Carter explained in their April 29th letter, “Financial inclusion and pathways out of poverty are a central part of this [strategic] plan and a critical part of reaching the 2030 goal. The powerful holistic financial inclusion model that the Campaign has been developing and driving with partners will become a centerpiece of RESULTS’ advocacy agenda on economic opportunity.”

In his acceptance speech for the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014, Muhammad Yunus credited RESULTS with having been “the most critical partner for microcredit,” as Bornstein put it. And, they were a critical partner because of the power of a 1000 volunteers raising their voice together to advocate for important policy changes. Yunus recounted a story from his early days as a PhD student in the U.S., walking the halls of Congress and recognizing the importance of citizens standing up for what they believe in.

Let’s close with this look back at a keynote address by Muhammad Yunus at the 2010 Regional Microcredit Summit in Nairobi. He tells the assembled delegates “This is the age of making ‘impossibles’ possible. It is us who decide,” he said, and it is us — citizens — who need to contribute to making change possible. Yunus exhorted us “that we can all work together rather than complaining about lousy government, saying they can’t deliver. There’s no way they can deliver — no matter what — unless we as citizens come together and do it as individuals, together.”

This is the credo upon which RESULTS is founded. RESULTS is making a difference in the world by influencing political decisions — both in the halls of your government as well as in implementing organizations — that will bring an end to poverty.

Muhammad Yunus: A new economic theory of selflessness

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Social biz plenary_GWaly, Yunus
Ghada Waly, Egypt’s Minister of Social Solidarity, and Nobel laureate, Muhammad Yunus, founder of Grameen Bank and the “father of microfinance,” got into a heated debate about the whole thesis of economic theory. The two distinguished speakers were on the panel for the “Scaling Business Models for Social Impact” plenary at the 18th Microcredit Summit (March 14-17 in Abu Dhabi).

Businesses have the ability to scale, delivering products and services on a global basis by providing for the needs and desires of their customers. But, the business focus on maximizing profits often lead limited attention to social challenges. Nonprofits have shown the ability to address a large variety of social problems, but the need to raise funds from donors often limits their ability to scale to the level of the problems they seek to address. Social businesses combine these two organizational models, using the power of business to solve some of the world’s most pressing social problems.

Minister Waly argued at the end of the session that businesses contribute to the well-being of society and to ending poverty — whether they do CSR or have a social mission or not — simply by creating jobs, paying taxes, and so on.

“Those companies that do not even do CSR [corporate social responsibility] but provide a service that is needed for society. Be it a pharmaceutical company or garment company, if they employ people, pay them fairly, and create jobs, this is good enough and this is very much needed. So you need everything.”

Prof. Yunus countered that human beings are both selfish and selfless, and the business world and economics can be structured to lift up the selfless side of human nature.

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Mourning the passing of a microfinance pioneer: Dr. Harihar Dev Pant

HD Pant_karobar Daily

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>>Authored by Dr. D.S.K. Rao, Regional Director for Asia-Pacific

We learned recently that a great friend of the Microcredit Summit Campaign died of lung cancer earlier this month. Dr. Harihar Dev Pant, a pioneer of microfinance in Nepal, started his career in microfinance as a deputy director in the Nepal Rastra Bank (NRB, the country’s central bank), and went on to found one of the largest microfinance banks in Nepal, Nirdhan Utthan Bank Ltd. He was its chairman and CEO till near the end.

A quote from Muhammad Yunus: “Dr. Pant was such a magnificent human being. What a life of total dedication to the cause of the poor he lived. We all mourn his untimely death.”As the deputy governor of the central bank, Dr. Pant laid the foundation for microcredit in Nepal. Dr. Pant was greatly influenced by Prof. Muhammad Yunus (to the right) and was indoctrinated by the Nobel laureate into microfinance.

As the deputy governor he was responsible in creating five rural banks in Nepal specializing in microcredit operations and following the Grameen Bank lending methodology. Dr. Pant was the founder-chairman of the first two Grameen Bikas Banks in Nepal: Purbanchal Grameen Bikas Bank and Sudur Paschimanchal Grameen Bikas Bank. After his retirement from the central bank, he created Nirdhan Utthan Bank, which grew rapidly to become one of the largest MFIs in the country.

Dr. Pant was also a great friend of Microcredit Summit Campaign. He attended all of the Summits in the early years and acted as a panelist many times in plenaries and workshop sessions. His latest contribution was at the Global Microcredit Summit 2011 in Spain. He shared how his staff managed to reach remote, mountainous areas of Nepal, and how Nirdhan manages to balance the necessity of being profitable and meeting their social mission.

Dr. D.S.K. Rao

Dr. D.S.K. Rao

Whenever I visited Nepal in 2000s, Dr. Pant extended full cooperation. He introduced me to the promoters of all the major MFIs in the country and helped me to develop a rapport with them. He also helped in organizing workshops, participated with microfinance stakeholders, particularly practitioners.

Dr. Pant was very keen that Nirdhan, the bank he promoted, have a strong poverty focus. He commenced the service by offering loans of Rs.3,000 to Rs.5,000 ($28-47) to underprivileged women to run microenterprises. Dr. Pant also showed a keen interest in qualitative poverty measurement tools, such as the CASHPOR Housing Index and poverty wealth ranking, and he introduced them in his bank. He was deeply concerned that microfinance too, like formal banks, may be missing the really poor households. He gave much more importance to depth of poverty outreach over scaling up the program through reckless financing.

Dr. Pant keenly followed the progress of microfinance in Asia, particularly in South Asia. One could speak to him on any subject, ranging from banking, finance, economics, culture, and, of course, politics. Such was his passion towards microfinance that despite severe setbacks to his health in the last couple of years, Dr. Pant continued his active involvement with the sector.

Dr. Pant had been suffering from lung cancer for the last seven months. He was diagnosed in February and received treatment at Rajiv Gandhi Super Speciality Hospital in New Delhi, India. Dr-PantLately, he underwent treatment at Nepal Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lalitpur. He passed away at his residence in Anamnagar, Kathmandu on September 8th.

Pant was the father figure of microfinance in Nepal. A kind and jovial person. Deep condolences to his family.

May his soul rest in peace.


Additional words of remembrance

“When the Microcredit Summit Campaign was launched 18 years ago, I found it quite remarkable that a high ranking Central Bank official in any country had so fully embraced microfinance for the very poor. But that is what Dr. HD Pant had done and it was an honor to have his wisdom and commitment contribute to the success of the Summits that followed. I hope his family and friends find some solace in the greatness of his achievements.”
— Sam Daley-Harris, Founder, Microcredit Summit Campaign; and CEO, Center for Citizen Empowerment and Transformation (CCET)

Shankar Man Shrestha“He was a good friend and served the microfinance sector with devotion and dedication. While I focused in the eastern region of Nepal, Dr. Pant worked in the western region in the districts of Rupandehi, Kapilbastu and Nawalparasi. We competed and also complemented each other. Dr. Pant was an honest and hardworking man, wholly committed towards his work for the poor. It is very sad to lose a colleague and friend of many years.”
— Shankar Man Shrestha, Chairman, Centre for Self-help Development; and former CEO, Rural Microfinance Development Centre Ltd.

From Microcredit to What?! by Sam Daley-Harris

April is the Month of Microfinance. http://monthofmicrofinance.org/

April is the Month of Microfinance. http://monthofmicrofinance.org/

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Reposted with permission


>>Authored by Sam Daley-Harris, founder and former director of the Microcredit Summit Campaign. He is currently running the Center for Citizen Empowerment and Transformation.

When the American Economic Journal recently published a group of independent studies suggesting that tiny loans to the poor usually don’t raise incomes, it left me scratching my head (although this response to those studies did ring true). As the first director of the Microcredit Summit Campaign, I’ve had the privilege of observing anti-poverty fighters like Grameen Bank founder Muhammad Yunus and BRAC founder Fazle Abed for decades. They, and others like them, never said, “We’re giving millions of microloans a year, we’re done!” Instead, they kept asking this question: “What more do our clients need to move themselves and their families out of poverty.” That question, the effectiveness of their responses to it, and the scale of their institutions have helped their country, Bangladesh, be among the poorest countries in the world most likely to achieve all of the Millennium Development Goals on time.

I first met Muhammad Yunus in 1987. By then Grameen Bank had already worked with its clients to develop the bank’s “16 Decisions,” pledges the clients made that included: 1) we shall not live in dilapidated houses, we shall repair our houses and work towards constructing new houses, 2) we shall grow vegetables all the year round, eat plenty of them and sell the surplus, 3) we shall plan to keep our families small. We shall minimize our expenditures. We shall look after our health, 4) we shall educate our children, 5) we shall build and use pit-latrines, and 6) we shall drink water from tube wells. If it is not available, we shall boil water or use alum.

To be sure, banks like Citi and Barclay’s never had a pit latrine policy with their clients, but this poverty-fighting microfinance institution (MFI) did.

It would take weeks of blogging to cover BRAC’s beyond-the-micro-loan initiatives. But, just as an example, BRAC’s ultra-poor program has been replicated around the world and its schools for children who never entered school or dropped out at an early age are a global model.

Grameen Phone ladies

Grameen Phone ladies

Grameen Phone and Grameen Shakti (a renewable energy company) are giants in Bangladesh and their work with the poor are examples of a microfinance institution continuing to ask what more can be done to improve the well-being its clients.

This eye-popping creativity coming out of microfinance has fascinated me for decades and has taken an entirely different direction with the work of Marshall Saunders, founder of Citizen’s Climate Lobby. In the early 1990s, Saunders worked with Rotary to raise $700,000 for FINCA, teamed with Grameen Foundation and their five-year strategy to help its partners add five million new clients, and then rolled up his sleeves and started Grameen del la Frontera, a microfinance institution in the state of Sonora, Mexico. But along the way, Saunders also got involved as a citizen advocate with the anti-poverty lobby group RESULTS.

Saunders’ view of the world was shaped, in part, by this early encounter with RESULTS. He joined me for a radio interview I was doing on the NPR station in San Diego. During the interview I mentioned that RESULTS had successfully lobbied Congress for $200 million for microcredit.

“At first I thought ‘that’s not right,’” Saunders recalled. “I had busted my butt for three years to raise nearly $700,000 through Rotary, and RESULTS had raised $200 million in their lobbying….it didn’t seem to be realistic, the $200 million. I did make a mental note of it however.”

Saunders continued his work with RESULTS and made a serious commitment to Grameen de la Frontera. He had read about climate change and realized that sea level rise would affect some of his clients.

“It occurred to me that I was trying to get 5,000 more borrowers in Mexico,” Saunders said, “and that Bangladesh might lose millions due to sea level rise. I felt I had to get to the bottom of this. I went to see “An Inconvenient Truth” and went back about a week later…. Then I read that Al Gore was going to train 1,000 people. I said “holy socks, of course that’s what I want to do.”

He joined about 250 others in Nashville, TN for one of the trainings and returned to San Diego to lead the slide show dozens of times. Early on he realized that 98 percent of the information focused on the problem of climate change and that just 2 percent focused on what people could do about it. In addition, many of the actions centered on using more energy efficient light bulbs but didn’t really get at the big picture, public policy.

This microfinance promoter, hunger activist and newly minted climate educator was now reading the newspaper every morning and read that Congress had just approved $18 billion in subsidies to the fossil fuel industry.

“I’d gotten people to change 18 light bulbs yesterday,” he thought, “and that same day Congress approved $18 billion in subsidies to the fossil fuel industry. This is never going to work.”

In 2007 Saunders asked me to coach him in starting Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL). Several months later he led his first presentation with 29 people in the room. He hoped that at least four would agree to become the first chapter of CCL, but all 29 said yes. In 2014, CCL volunteers in the US and Canada had 2,253 letters to the editor published (up from 36 in 2010), had 291 op-eds published (up from 20 in 2010), and had 1,086 meetings with members of Congress, Parliament, or their staff (up from 106 in 2010). Doing something to protect microfinance clients in Bangladesh from the effects of climate change was his first impetus.

When the American Economic Journal recently published a group of independent studies suggesting that tiny loans to the poor usually don’t raise incomes it left me scratching my head. While CCL is truly a unique case, I still wonder why the researchers keep looking at just one intervention when the practitioners know it takes more and why they keep looking at the wrong institutions.


Sam Daley-Harris is the author of Reclaiming Our Democracy (www.reclaimingourdemocracy.org). He founded the anti-poverty lobby RESULTS in 1980 (www.results.org), founded the Microcredit Summit Campaign in 1995 (www.microcreditsummit.org), founded what would grow to become Truelift in 2010 (www.truelift.com), and founded the Center for Citizen Empowerment and Transformation in 2012 (www.citizenempowermentandtransformation.org). Portions of this blog are taken from Reclaiming Our Democracy: Healing the Break between People and Government © Copyright 2013 by Sam Daley-Harris. Published by Camino Books, Inc., Philadelphia, PA. Used by permission of the publisher. All rights reserved.

The Capital of Pro-Poor Microfinance

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Muhammad Yunus speaks with other participants at the 17th Microcredit Summit in Mexico

Bangladesh is known as the birthplace of modern microfinance, but many people see that as an old story. What is not as widely known is that Bangladesh continues to be the capital of pro-poor microfinance, a laboratory of innovation and integration focused on reaching clients in poverty and facilitating movement out of poverty.

Here are 4 reasons why Bangladesh still leads the industry:

1. The Yunus Centre Social Business Design Lab
The Yunus Centre holds Social Business Design Labs at least once a month where people present their social business ideas to potential funders (they are live streamed and available online). The funders are various Grameen Social Business Funds, and while some of the presenters are larger social business ideas, most of the Design Lab is dedicated to the ideas of Nobin Udyokta (young entrepreneurs), who are children of Grameen clients.

Each Design Lab presenter gets 5 minutes to present his or her project and 10 minutes to answer questions from the audience. At the end, the audience is broken up into groups and each groups meets with one of the presenters for half an hour to ask more in-depth questions. At the end, the groups report on whether or not they recommend the business for investment.

By the time they get to these presentations, the business owners have all worked closely with their investors in developing their business plans and preparing to answer questions. All of the businesses were recommended for funding.

Grameen phone ladies from 2007

Grameen phone ladies from 2007

What is interesting about this process is the generational evolution it shows in the development of the businesses and the sophistication of the finances. While Grameen Bank clients mostly ran basic livelihood projects with no accounting, these businesses run by their children have accounts, business plans, and investors.

2. UDDIPAN
UDDIPAN (United Development Initiatives for Programmed Actions) works in 37 of the 64 districts in Bangladesh. They serve 450,000 microfinance clients and 2,400,000 beneficiaries.

UDDIPAN’s vision is “To build an environmentally sound society without poverty, free of exploitation, oppression, injustice and discrimination where children, women and men live with dignity and capable to exercise their rights and will have access to and participation in the mainstream socio-economic, political and cultural processes.”

UDDIPAN photo

An UDDIPAN client looks after her cows. Photo credit: UDDIPAN

Uddipan has designed programs and products around the ultra poor, green energy, people with disabilities, and Islamic self-help groups. Here are some examples:

  • After doing a study that found high levels of child malnutrition, Uddipan educated their clients to provide house-to-house training in nutrition.
  • They run a tube well and toilet program with Water.org.
  • They provide primary health care services in 4 of their branches.
  • They have organized 2,400 imams to work for peace and against human trafficking.
  • They advocate on child rights and train their clients to avoid child labor.

3. TMSS
TMSS (Thengamara Mohila Sabuj Sangha) works in 20,000 villages in the country, serving 930,000 clients (800,000 with loans and savings and the rest with only savings). In 84 of their branches, TMSS also operates a clinic staffed by nurses and community doctors.

TMSS’ microfinance unit is called Health, Education and Microfinance (HEM), since all three activities are linked together in the microfinance delivery. HEM is only one part of the 14 domains that TMSS works in. They also run hospitals, medical training schools, other technical training schools, agricultural and fisheries projects, human rights projects and climate and environmental change programs.

All told, TMSS works with 4.7 million women organized in groups. Their motto is “Family development through women’s empowerment.”

4. Palli Karma-Sahayak Foundation (PKSF)
PKSF is a government supported apex funding unit in Bangladesh. In the past, it supported groups like Grameen, BRAC, and ASA, but these groups have graduated from their funding and PKSF is now focusing in the next tier of MFIs. PKSF currently funds about 60 MFIs.

PKSF Chair Qazzi Kholiquzzamn Ahmad has been a critic of microfinance as a stand-alone activity, but a strong proponent of microfinance linked with other human development services.

Key Elements of ENRICH. Source: http://bit.ly/PKSF-AHolisticApproach

Key Elements of ENRICH, which is short for “Enhancing Resources and Increasing Capacities of Poor Households towards Elimination of their Poverty.” Source: http://bit.ly/PKSF-AHolisticApproach

Under his leadership, PKSF has not only implemented agricultural value chain projects, but also the ENRICH program, which supports MFIs to integrate education, health, nutrition, water and sanitation, energy and climate change response into their programs. Four years after its inception, “ENRICH is flourishing into a model of sustainable poverty alleviation, continually seeking solutions to ameliorate the poverty situation in Bangladesh,” according to PKSF. Learn more.

In addition, PKSF operates the PRIME program (“Programmed Initiatives for Monga Eradication”), which supports MFIs in their work with the ultra poor by addressing food insecurity and seasonal hunger. DFID has recognized the PRIME program as their most effective poverty alleviation investment.

Yunus Centre fulfills Campaign Commitment by cultivating ‘job-givers’

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The Yunus Centre has worked tirelessly to promote the philosophy of Professor Mohammad Yunus and to alleviate poverty through social entrepreneurship and turning ‘job-seekers’ into ‘job-givers’. The Yunus Centre declared its support for the goal of helping 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty by announcing a Campaign Commitment at the 2013 Partnerships against Poverty Summit held last October 2013 in Manila, Philippines. The Microcredit Summit Campaign recently caught up with the Yunus Centre to learn about the progress they’ve made on their Commitment and the ways they are working towards the end of extreme poverty.


“The poor themselves can create a poverty-free world all we have to do is to free them from the chains that we have put around them.” – Professor Mohammad Yunus

Yunus

Professor Mohammad Yunus, winner of Nobel Peace Prize for his work with microfinance and founding of the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. Image courtesy of Yunus Centre.

Founded in 2006, the Yunus Centre actively promotes and disseminates the philosophy of world-renowned microfinance leader Professor Mohammad Yunus. Professor Yunus believes we can achieve the end of poverty through microfinance and social entrepreneurship.

In October of 2013, the Yunus Centre made the Commitment to support the 100 Million Project through the following actions:

By the end of 2018:

  • Create a global social business sector serving at least 100 million poor, and providing jobs and for at least 10 million households.

In just over one year, by the end of 2014:

  • Help create, finance and expand more than 50 social businesses in at least 20 countries world-wide.
  • Create Social Business Incubator Funds, and other structures, in at least 8 countries: Albania, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Haiti, India, Tunisia and Uganda
  • Social businesses in Bangladesh will serve at least 2 million households, and employ at least 20,000 households.
  • Collect and publish relevant social-impact data for all social businesses.

Yunus Centre Campaign Commitment Outlook: Achieving the 2014 Benchmarks   

The Yunus Centre has achieved outstanding progress since announcing its Campaign Commitment in 2013.

The Yunus Centre has met its 2013 benchmark of creating, financing and expanding more than 50 social businesses.

As of May 2014, the Yunus Centre has helped launch more than 100 new social businesses in Bangladesh. Recently the Yunus Centre introduced a new initiative called nobin udyoktas(‘new entrepreneurs’ in Bangladeshi) which is aimed primarily at the children of Grameen Bank borrowers and intends to turn them from ‘job seekers’ into ‘job creators’. Every month the Yunus Centre hosts a social business design lab which is a platform for entrepreneurs to present their social business designs in front of experienced business executives and social activists. Initial successes have helped the Yunus Centre to gain momentum in encouraging youth to make their own destiny through social business ventures. The Centre projects that it will reach 200 new social businesses by the end of 2014.

However work remains to be done. The Yunus Centre committed to create, finance, and expand more than 50 social businesses in 20 countries worldwide. They have achieved remarkable success in Bangladesh, but what about the rest of the world? So far Yunus Social Business (YSB) has launched social businesses in Colombia, Costa Rica, Tunisia, Haiti and Albania.As an example, in Colombia, the Yunus Centre partnered with McCain Foods to launch Campo Vivo, a social business that will benefit farmers living in poverty by aiding them in the production and commercialization of potatoes, carrots and peas. The Yunus Centre has made great progress towards achieving the first goal of its Commitment; nonetheless, expanding social businesses into other countries will remain a priority as they seek to reach their target of 20.

Yunus Centre has achieved its goal of creating Social Business Incubator Funds in eight countries.

Yunus Centre launched Social Business Incubator Funds in Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Haiti, Albania, Tunisia, Uganda and India since 2013. The goal of these incubator funds is to provide start-up investment for social businesses when traditional banks may not be willing to invest. The funds are designed to be financially sustainable at $13.5 to $20.5 million and can be expected to invest in approximately 6 new social businesses each year. Some of the incubator funds are already providing services to entrepreneurs.

Although the Yunus Centre has made considerable progress towards achieving its Commitment, it has not yet been able to quantify its impact.

In October of 2013, the Yunus Centre boldly committed to helping social businesses serve 2 million households and employ 20,000 households. Because most of the social businesses are start-up enterprises, they are in the process of developing their market and scaling up their operations. Therefore, it is difficult to estimate exactly how many households the social businesses are currently serving. The number is undoubtedly increasing as new social businesses are generated across Bangladesh. Once the Yunus Centre better determines how many households are being served and employed by social businesses in Bangladesh, it will publish the information on socialbusinesspedia.com. After a social business has been operational for a few years and it becomes feasible to measure its impact, the Yunus Centre publishes all relevant social impact data on Social Business Pedia.

Grameen Veolia

Grameen-Veolia Water Ltd. Image courtesy of Yunus Centre.


Join us in Mexico for the 17th Microcredit Summit this September 3-5. Professor Yunus will be a keynote speaker in addition to moderating workshops on social business and youth employment. http://17microcreditsummit.org/


Turning Social Businesses into a Poverty Elimination Tool 

One example of a social business pioneered by the Yunus Foundation is Grameen-Veolia Water Ltd. Although water supply is abundant in Bangladesh, much of the groundwater is contaminated with arsenic for geological reasons. Grameen Healthcare Services partnered with Veolia Water to provide clean water and distribute it to a vast network of rural villages. The joint venture has been established according to the social business principals advocated by the Yunus Centre.

One example of a social business pioneered by the Yunus Foundation is Grameen-Veolia Water Ltd. Although water supply is abundant in Bangladesh, much of the groundwater is contaminated with arsenic for geological reasons. Grameen Healthcare Services partnered with Veolia Water to provide clean water and distribute it to a vast network of rural villages. The joint venture has been established according to the social business principals advocated by the Yunus Centre.

The Yunus Centre views its Campaign Commitment as an integral part of the achieving its mission and helping lift 100 million families out of extreme poverty. The Commitment contributes in two ways to the goal: 1) new services are being introduced to the next generation of microfinance stakeholders, and 2) the ‘nobin udyokta’ initiative is providing equity financing for social businesses to create a generation of ‘job givers’ instead of ‘job seekers’. Professor Yunus shared his enthusiasm for the progress the Yunus Centre has made towards achieving its Commitment stating, “We are excited about new possible openings, especially social business gaining momentum in many countries. It’s a starting point for a global movement.”

Through these efforts the Yunus Centre is making large contributions to the 100 Million Goal. Standing alongside the Campaign’s coalition of actors who have stated their Campaign Commitment, the Yunus Centre is helping make the end of extreme poverty possible and achievable.


Join Yunus Centre and State your Campaign Commitment

Join Yunus Centre in the global coalition help 100 million families lift themselves out of poverty – state your Campaign Commitment at mycommitment@microcreditsummit.org

Need additional guidance in formulating your own Campaign Commitment? Refer to our Commitment Development Toolkit.

Be social with us on Facebook and Twitter (@MicroCredSummit) using the hashtags #Commit100M and #100MGoal

Learn more about the Microcredit Summit Campaign: http://www.microcreditsummit.org/

Partnering to End Extreme Poverty

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“Together we can achieve an important milestone in human history. A world that is free—truly free—from extreme poverty.”
—World Bank President Jim Kim EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Creating Solutions for Social Problems

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“Invest in us and change the world.” That’s what social business is all about. —Muhammad Yunus EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Opening Ceremony Sets the Tone for 2013 Summit

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“Together we can achieve an important milestone in human history. A world that is free—truly free—from extreme poverty.” — World Bank President Jim Yong Kim EspañolFrançais Continue reading

A Declaration in Support of the Independence of Grameen Bank

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More than 800 delegates, representing 145 institutions and 71 countries met this declaration with a standing ovation. Continue reading

Reflections from the 2013 Summit – Last and third day + Closing Ceremony!

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The third and final day of our Summit was just as eventful and exciting as the first two. The day started off with the “Social Business: Creating solutions for social problems” plenary, moderated by Imelda Nicolas, Secretary of the Commission … Continue reading

Larry Reed’s Letter to the Editor: Microcredit in Bangladesh

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Sheikh Hasina would be better served by finding creative ways to partner with Grameen Bank–like other governments have learned how to do. EspañolFrançais Continue reading

The Legacy of Muhammad Yunus: Changing the Way We Think about Business

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Lea en español (traducido por Google) *** Lisez en français (traduit par Google) Jonathan Morduch hits the nail on the head about what is at the core of the social business paradigm:  that we need to change the assumptions about the … Continue reading

Celebrate with Muhammad Yunus: Participate Virtually in Events around the Gold Medal Ceremony

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On April 17, Congress will honor Professor Muhammad Yunus with the Congressional Gold Medal for his lifelong mission of ending poverty and his innovative microfinance work, including the creation of the Grameen Bank. (See the announcement from Speaker Boehner’s office.) … Continue reading

Signez notre pétition de soutien envers Grameen Bank

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Soutenez les femmes de Grameen pour empêcher une violation de leurs droits La Campagne du Sommet du Microcrédit soutient une pétition sur le site Change.org pour avertir la Premier Ministre du Bangladesh Sheikh Hasina que les actions continues de son … Continue reading