Video Corner | Lev Plaves of Kiva on measuring impact

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Lev Plaves of KIVA talks with Miranda Beshara, editor of the Arabic Microfinance Gateway, about what he was most excited to learn about at the 18th Microcredit Summit. “What we are most excited about is how much discussion there was at the Summit about how different stakeholders — whether investors or practitioners — are really working to improve how we’re measuring impact,” Plaves says. “That was really great to see, and I am excited to see moving forward how that plays out in terms of people working to really increase how we are quantifying the outcomes we are having as an industry.”

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Swedes, chimps, and you and me on sustainable development

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>>Authored by Sabina Rogers

Earlier this year at the World Economic Forum (WEF), Hans Rosling opened his presentation, “Sustainable Development: Demystifying the Facts,” with three questions for the audience about the state of global development (about extreme poverty, measles vaccination, and population in 2100). He was testing their knowledge in order to illustrate how preconceived ideas will do us wrong.

He had done this test before. Rosling conducted studies with Swedes, Americans, and chimps about the state of global development. The chimps were asked to choose a banana that is associated with 1 of 3 possible answers, and they got the answer correct 33 percent of the time. In essence, they were bound to be right 1 time in 3; the humans were not as lucky. Basically, according to his study, chimps in a zoo have a better chance of choosing the right answers at random to questions about the state of the world than the average Swede and American does.

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Campaign to host workshop with World Bank Annual Meeting in Peru

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Are you attending the 2015 Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund in Lima, Peru? Join us at the Civil Society Policy Forum* for a workshop to explore how microfinance and financial inclusion can contribute to the fight against extreme poverty.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign will host a workshop at the Forum at the World Bank Annual Meeting in Lima from October 6-9. The Forum promotes substantive dialogue and an exchange of views between Bank/Fund staff, civil society organizations (CSO), government officials, academics, and other stakeholders.

6 Financial Inclusion Pathways to End Extreme Poverty — What Role Can You Play?

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#tbt: Clients Continue Movement above the US$1 a day Threshold

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We are pleased to bring you this #ThursdayThrowback blog post, which was originally published in The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report 2011. We commissioned a study to estimate the net number of microcredit client households in Bangladesh that crossed the US$1.25 a day threshold between 1990 and 2008. You can download a copy of the study from our Resource Library as well.

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Colombia, a “Pathways” poster child

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>>Authored by Paul Gostomski, Microcredit Summit Campaign Program Intern

The 100 Million Project, an initiative of the Microcredit Summit Campaign, aims galvanize and support work that helps advance industry toward the goal of helping 100 million families lift themselves out extreme poverty. To do so, the Microcredit Summit Campaign advocates adoption of “Six Pathways,” which are financial inclusion strategies that can reach the extreme poor and facilitate their movement out of extreme poverty.

The Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP), a global partnership of 34 leading organizations that seek to advance financial inclusion, recently published a paper that does an excellent job highlighting two pathways that are currently being implemented in Colombia: conditional cash transfers and an initiative to link mobile banking services with agent networks.

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Community-based financial inclusion: Sarah’s story

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Sarah Chikuse standing in front of her pigsty

>>Authored by Alex Dalitso Kaomba, development consultant and freelance writer

At 39 years of age, Sarah Chikuse’s health is visibly better than the other women in her village. A single mother of two, she lives in Kang’oma village on the outskirts of Lilongwe’s Area 23 in Malawi. Her day starts at 4:00 AM when she usually wakes up to the din of her neighbors’ jerry cans and water tins at the only borehole in the village.

Sarah starts by lighting up her charcoal burner so that it gathers heat while she fetches water at the borehole. Next on the routine (if it’s during school term) is preparing her daughters for school. Once she bids her daughters goodbye, she tends to her newly acquired livestock.

Acquiring a pig is one highlight on her growing list of achievements. Sarah counts herself a success in being able to afford three meals a day for her family and providing her children with a basic education. She has paid their school fees and provides their books, uniforms, and lighting for evening homework.

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Getting the ultra-poor on the “economy train”

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More than one-fifth of the world’s population lives on less than US$1.25 per day (the “extreme poor”), and most of those people live in rural areas. Due mostly to geographic constraints, it is difficult and costly to reach this population with financial and social services. Having poor infrastructure and few tools, they are stuck in a perpetual cycle of poverty.

This is a problem just begging for a solution. How about six financial inclusion strategies — our “six pathways” — that show promise in ending extreme poverty? Specifically, how about BRAC’s Graduation Approach? In 2002, BRAC set out to help the ultra-poor living on less than 80 cents a day to move up one level of poverty and to develop an approach that could tackle the geography obstacle.

In June, Science magazine published the results of six randomized controlled trial (RCT) impact assessments of BRAC’s Graduation Approach. Read our recap of the “Creating Sustainable Livelihoods for the Poorest” event hosted by CGAP, IPA, and J-PAL.

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Who will pay for the end of poverty?

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This year, the world is coming together in a series of global meetings to decide the level of political ambition we’ll bring to the eradication of poverty.

On Monday, RESULTS UK (a sister organization to our RESULTS Educational Fund) released a report at the Financing for Growth conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where the global community was negotiating who will foot the bill to eradicate poverty.

Titled “Who Pays for Progress? The Role of Domestic Resource Mobilisation and Development Assistance in Financing Health. A Case Study from Kenya,” RESULTS UK’s report focuses on Kenya’s reclassification from a low-income country (LIC) to a lower-middle-income country (LMIC) and how that reclassification will affect financing for health needs in Kenya. Oxley’s HuffPo article lays out RESULTS’ argument for strong and ambitious commitments from the global community to finance the next phase of development goals and the end of poverty.
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#tbt: Lobbying the World Bank, Part I

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#Tbt_6We are pleased to bring you this #ThursdayThrowback blog post, which was originally published in The State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report 2004. The RESULTS International Conference is only three weeks away (July 18-21), and grassroots activists from the U.S. and around the world will be in D.C. to lobby the USAID Administrator and World Bank Directors.


In this introduction to the State of the Microcredit Summit Campaign Report, rather than presenting a neat, uncontested picture of the field of microcredit seen solely from the Campaign’s perspective, we think it useful to listen to the challenges and opposition to what the Campaign and these parliamentarians have championed, coming as it does from some of the most influential institutions in development. In the pages that follow, we invite you to listen in on debates that contrast the views of the World Bank and CGAP with those of industry leaders like BRAC founder Fazle Abed, Grameen Bank founder Muhammad Yunus, and the Microcredit Summit Campaign. What follows are excerpts from the World Bank and CGAP’s responses to the 700 parliamentarians, along with reactions from the Microcredit Summit Campaign.

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“By the Numbers”: Financial inclusion still limited for the hardest-to-reach

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Bravo to the Center for Financial Inclusion’s (CFI) latest By the Numbers report. It does an excellent job of succinctly parsing a large amount of information in such a way that makes the implications of that information quite accessible. Here’s our key takeaway from the report:

We are making the least progress on the hardest-to-reach groups, and unless the financial inclusion community works together to develop a strategy for reaching those groups, there is no way we can meet the goal of full financial inclusion by 2020.

To begin with, we need to address the fact that the rate of improvement reported in the Global Findex seems likely to be overstated. CFI refers, in By the Numbers, to the criticism levied by Daniel Roodman and Daniel Rozas against the claims of this year’s Findex. They very clearly lay out how the differences between the 2011 and 2014 Findex questionnaire could have an inflationary impact on estimating progress.

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World Bank report documents progress on poverty reduction and path ahead for Ethiopia

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The World Bank released a report in January about the progress made on poverty reduction in Ethiopia between 2000 and 2011, and it described what will be needed to end extreme poverty by 2030. Given our program with MasterCard Foundation in 2014 (see this post summarizing the “Innovations in Social Protection” program) this was of particular interest to us.

The Campaign is also increasingly focused on understanding how 6 key financial inclusion pathways are showing great promise in contributing to the end of extreme poverty.

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E-Workshop Recap: Helping Clients to Prepare for their Old Age

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Exciting opportunities to help an aging world EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Ultra Poor Graduation

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>> Authored by Shameran Abed, Director, BRAC Microfinance Programme

Shameran Abed, BRAC’s Director of Microfinance, joined the Microfinance CEO Working Group in January. He and BRAC are welcome to additions to this collaboration. He joins the Working Group’s efforts to support the positive development of the microfinance industry and brings tremendous insigShameran Abedht into the discussion around pathways out of poverty.

This month, the results from six randomised controlled trials (RCTs), published in Science magazine highlighted a model of development that is an adaptable and exportable solution able to raise households from the worst forms of destitution and put them on to a pathway of self-reliance. The graduation approach — financial services integrated within a broader set of wrap-around services — is gaining steady recognition for its astonishing ability to transform the lives of the poorest.

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