ESAF Microfinance commits to comprehensive services for clients

ESAF Microfinance trains community health workers and organizes health fairs for their clients and poor communities. Photo courtesy of ESAF Microfinance
— Read the press release announcing ESAF Microfinance’s Campaign Commitment
— Read their Commitment letter

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The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes ESAF Microfinance as the 57th organization to make a Campaign Commitment. ESAF joins a global coalition to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty. ESAF will help support their clients in uplifting themselves from poverty by providing them with education, training, and support services.

ESAF and the Campaign strongly believe that microfinance services should be complemented by education, training, and other supporting programs that help poor families battle chronic poverty and social exclusion. For example, in partnership with the Campaign, ESAF trained community health workers (Arogya Mithras in Hindi) to provide health education and front-line screening services for non-communicable diseases to poor communities. You can learn about that project in “Integrating Health with Microfinance: Community Health Workers in Action.”

For the financial year 2015-2016, ESAF Microfinance aims to reach out to new clients through its products and services, committing to the following:

  1. To offer microfinance services to 200,000 new clients through expanding the geographic reach in some of the backward states of Chattisgarh, Jharkhand, West Bengal, and Bihar.
  2. To increase the reach of financial services to an additional 10% of clients, making it to a total of 50% of clients who belong to socially backward communities/tribes (scheduled castes and scheduled tribes as per government of India)
  3. To offer livelihood support services to at least 10,000 clients who shall be in a position to contribute to the income of their household.
  4. To measure the poverty levels of 200,000 clients using PPI.
  5. To offer financial literacy training to at least 50,000 clients.
  6. To offer health education and awareness sessions to at least 50,000 clients and to offer health check-up services to benefit at least 5,000 clients.
  7. To offer financial and non-financial services to at least 3,000 PWD (persons with disabilities) clients.
  8. To offer women’s leadership and empowerment programs to benefit at least 50,000 clients.
  9. To reach at least 2,000 children through educational programs for academic growth and value education.
  10. Educate at least 50,000 clients on environment protection and use of clean energy products.

Chairman and managing director, K. Paul Thomas, explains why their commitment includes a number or programs addressing multiple aspects of the client’s life such as health:

“ESAF’s vision and mission very clearly emphasize on holistic transformation of its poor clients,” he said, “and, we are convinced this cannot be achieved unless their health issues are addressed.”

ESAF Microfinance is one of the premier microfinance institutions in India today, particularly in Kerala, effectively empowering 750,000 members through 160 dedicated branches. The founder of ESAF ventured into microfinance in 1995, by organizing self-sustainable groups, to alleviate poverty and generate employment. Since then, ESAF has grown by leaps and bounds in the microfinance sector, promoting microfinance as a viable, sustainable, and effective means for creating jobs and reducing poverty.

Read the Commitment Letter from ESAF Microfinance.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign looks forward to welcoming our new partners to the global coalition and sharing their progress towards the Commitment achievement at the 18th Microcredit Summit. The Campaign’s 100 Million Project is building a movement among financial service stakeholders committed to helping to end extreme poverty through: public statements of commitment to action, expanding practices to reliably measure movement out of extreme poverty, and promoting innovations and best practices to accelerate movement out of poverty.


We invite you to join ESAF Microfinance and…

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Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:

How you can influence global policy priorities at the World Bank (event)

RESULTS is hosting its 35th annual International Conference on Capitol Hill in Washington DC from July 18th to July 21st, featuring many leading poverty experts, activists. and policy makers.

Join us at the 2015 RESULTS International Conference in Washington, D.C., this July 18-21. Leading poverty experts, activists, policymakers, and YOU will convene for a unique conference that mixes an educational experience and advocacy opportunities around increased access to education, health, and economic opportunity. Together, we can change the world!

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In just two weeks, RESULTS Educational Fund, the parent organization of the Microcredit Summit Campaign, will celebrate its 35th anniversary with the 2015 International Conference in Washington, D.C. We invite you to join in the festivities and attend our workshop called “Partnerships to End Poverty: Health, Government, and Financial Services” on Sunday, July 19th at 4:30 – 6:00 PM. The conference will be held at the Washington Court Hotel on Capitol Hill.

Only $85 a day!

RESULTS International Conference — only $85 a day!

Attendees of the International Conference will hear from leading experts, activists, and policymakers on the challenges and solutions to ending poverty. Join World Bank President Jim Yong Kim, Senator Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus (and, of course, founder of the Grameen Bank). Find out who else will be speaking here.

The conference agenda is designed to provide the information and tools to influence policymakers — so you can deliver the message directly to your representative on Capitol Hill and policymakers at the World Bank and USAID!

The Microcredit Summit Campaign’s role at RESULTS is to lift up financial inclusion solutions designed for the world’s extreme poor, creating economic opportunities to help lift themselves out of poverty. The Campaign will be leading a workshop at the International Conference about the future of financial inclusion.

Our session, entitled Partnerships to End Poverty: Health, Government, and Financial Services,” will focus on integrated health and microfinance and linking the graduation model and conditional cash transfers (CCTs). Learn why these are key pathways to help end extreme poverty and how you can influence the global development agenda. (Read more about the six pathways.)

Sonja Kelly of the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion will moderate a panel discussion with Olumide Elegbe of FHI 360 and our own Dr. DSK Rao and Larry Reed. Join us to develop your message and advocacy strategy around financial inclusion to end extreme poverty, and take it directly to major financial inclusion funders like the World Bank and USAID to influence their programmatic priorities in the over coming years.

About the panelists


Sonja Kelly, Fellow, CFI

Sonja Kelly is a fellow at the Center for Financial Inclusion at ACCION (@CFI_ACCION). She conducts research on supply and demand side opportunities to advance financial inclusion around the world, including income growth, demographic change, and policy shifts. Ms. Kelly is finishing her PhD at the School of International Service at American University, writing her dissertation on financial inclusion policy and regulation in low and middle income economies. Her research articulates the ways that international organizations and internal politics influence financial sector policy. She is also a consultant at the World Bank and the president of the DC chapter of Women Advancing Microfinance. Prior to joining CFI, Ms. Kelly worked in microfinance at Opportunity International.

Olumide Elegbe Olumide Elegbe, senior relationship manager at FHI 360, is a health and development expert with demonstrated results of building successful partnerships across sectors and geographies. With a focus on forging trusted, long term partnerships between the government, nonprofit and private sectors, Mr. Elegbe has a track record of brokering collaborative partnerships that drive social change by addressing health, education, sustainability and/or other development challenges. This, while delivering results and outcomes tailored to suit the needs of stakeholder individuals and organizations including market access, efficiencies in supply chain, and contribution to local GDP.

Mr. Elegbe has extensive international and cultural experience, spanning sub-Saharan Africa, Eastern and Western Europe as well as the USA. Prior to joining FHI 360, he worked as a public health specialist and a visiting lecturer in population medicine in the United Kingdom, and as technical advisor on public health programs in Nigeria.

Mr. Elegbe holds a Master’s Degree in Public Health with a minor in Health Services Management from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in the United Kingdom.

Dr. D.S.K. Rao, Regional Director for Asia-Pacific, Microcredit Summit Campaign

Dr. DSK Rao has been the regional director for the Asia-Pacific region with the Microcredit Summit Campaign since 2000. The Campaign draws heavily on his wide experience and familiarity with the sector while organizing the regional and global summits. Dr. Rao has conducted scores of workshops and trainings on tools for practitioners in Asia to track poverty and other social outcomes including the Cashpor Household Index, Poverty Wealth Ranking, and the Progress out of Poverty Index. Dr. Rao is presently implementing a Johnson & Johnson-funded project for integrating health with microfinance in India, in collaboration with Freedom from Hunger. He has co-authored two books on microfinance: The New Middlewomen and Development and Divinity and Dharma.

Larry Reed, Director, Microcredit Summit Campaign

Larry Reed has headed up the Microcredit Summit Campaign (@MicroCredSummit) since taking over the reins from founder, Sam Daley-Harris in 2011. Mr. Reed has co-authored the annual State of the Campaign Report for the last 5 years. He has worked for more than 25 years in designing, supporting, and leading activities and organizations that empower poor people to transform their lives and their communities. For the majority of that time, Reed worked with Opportunity International, including five years as their Africa regional director and eight years as the first CEO of the Opportunity International Network.


Our workshop will be held on Sunday, July 19th
from 4:30 – 6:00 PM
.

To attend the workshop and the International Conference, email IC2015[at]results.org
or register online

Daily registration is only $85.

RESULTS is an international movement of grassroots advocates raising their voices to end poverty. Through government program and policy advocacy, RESULTS staff and its massive network of grassroots activists help to address the root causes of poverty: lack of access to medical care, education, and opportunity to move up the economic ladder. Click here to read more about RESULTS.


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Equitas commits to improve focus on clients and service coverage

Read the press release announcing Equitas’ Campaign Commitment
Read their Commitment letter
Photo courtesy of Equitas

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The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes Equitas, a major Indian microfinance institution (MFI), as the 56th organization to make a Campaign Commitment, joining a global coalition working to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty.

Equitas is committing to expand its financial services and non-financial services to the following number of clients in the financial year 2015-2016 :

  • Provide 1.5 million clients with financial services.
  • Cover 70,000 clients under the food security program.
  • Cover 50,000 clients under the health education program.
  • Screen the health of 850,000 clients.
  • Partner hospitals will provide 3,000 Equitas clients discounted consultation/ treatment.
  • Use the Progress out of Poverty Index to measure the poverty level of 1.5 million clients.
  • Provide financial support to 3,000 disabled women.
  • Rehabilitate 200 homeless pavement dwellers.
  • Screen, educate, and track the health of 3,500 students in the 6 schools run by Equitas Trust.
  • Provide gainful employment to 15,000 unemployed youth.
  • Train 50,000 women in new skills to increase their income.

P.N. Vasudevan, founder and managing director of Equitas Micro Finance India P. Ltd., explains their mission and how they support the well-being of their clients:

“When we founded Equitas in 2007, we wanted to create an MFI which would be a global benchmark in fairness and transparency, two facets sadly missing from most of the MFIs globally.  Equitas is a Latin word meaning ‘Equitable,’ which means fair and transparent, and this philosophy is woven into every action of Equitas.  Equitas had started lending at 25.5% in 2007 (at a time when the other MFI rates were in the high thirties) and after 4 years, Reserve Bank of India capped the lending rate for MFIs in India at 26%! The Equitas Ecosystem Model is designed to support the well-being of our clients by providing financial and non financial services with a clear focus to address a large spectrum of their requirements in the field of health, education, skill development, food security during emergencies, placement for unemployed youth and many more.”

Equitas is an NBFC MFI with headquarters at Chennai, India, and operations in eight states, namely Tamil Nadu, Pondy, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Chattisgarh. Equitas has about 2.8 million active borrowers as of 31st March, 2015. Along with financial services, Equitas is also promoting several non-financial services aiming at holistic development of their clients and their families.

Read Commitment Letter from Equitas.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign looks forward to welcoming our new partners to the global coalition and sharing their progress towards the Commitment achievement at the 18th Microcredit Summit. The Campaign’s 100 Million Project is building a movement among financial service stakeholders committed to helping to end extreme poverty through: public statements of commitment to action, expanding practices to reliably measure movement out of extreme poverty, and promoting innovations and best practices to accelerate movement out of poverty.


We invite you to join Equitas and…

Get Inspired. Set a Goal. Make a Commitment.

Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:

Grama Vidiyal commits to expanding health services to clients

Read the press release announcing Grama Vidiyal’s Campaign Commitment
Read their Commitment letter
Photo courtesy of Grama Vidiyal

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The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes Grama Vidiyal, a major Indian microfinance institution (MFI), as the 55th organization to make a Campaign Commitment, joining a global coalition working to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty.

Grama Vidiyal commits to expand its financial and non-financial services to the following number of clients in the financial year 2015-2016:

  • Provide an additional 150,000 clients with financial services in FY15
  • Help 1,050,000 community members through Grama Vidiyal’s empowerment program.
  • Organize 720 health camps for clients, screening 300,000 members.
  • Provide 10,000 clients with discounted consultation/treatment in partner hospitals.
  • Provide health education to 80,000 client families (or community).
  • Give access to health related products and medicines to 150,000 clients.
  • Help 800,000 clients with the Free Meals program.
  • Install 1,000 household toilet connections and 4,000 water tap connections.
  • Establish 80 Community Knowledge Centers, engaging 30 poor students each (a total of 2,400 students), to motivate learning basic math and English.
  • Help 500,000 clients with the Health Service and Development Program that provides sanitary napkins for women.
  • Use the Progress out of Poverty Index to measure the poverty level of 35,000 clients.

Sathianathan Devaraj, chairman and managing director of Grama Vidiyal, explains the importance of microfinance as a means to financial inclusionhealth:

“Microfinance is a very important tool for financial inclusion, which provides financial services for poor entrepreneurs and small businesses lacking access to formal banking and related services. Microfinance creates a window for the poor where they can access quality financial services such as credit, savings, insurance etc., without inhibition. A double bottom line approach with the right balance of fiscal performance and positive social impact is key to the microfinance’s success. Formal banks identified and promoted bankable people, but microfinance introduced and proved that even the poor are trustworthy and bankable.”

Grama Vidiyal is one of the largest Indian microfinance institutions, serving one million clients over 5 Indian states. Their objective is to focus on eradication of poverty and improving the standard of living of downtrodden women.

Read Campaign Commitment letter from Grama Vidiyal.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign looks forward to welcoming our new partners to the global coalition and sharing their progress towards the Commitment achievement at the 18th Microcredit Summit. The Campaign’s 100 Million Project is building a movement among financial service stakeholders committed to helping to end extreme poverty through: public statements of commitment to action, expanding practices to reliably measure movement out of extreme poverty, and promoting innovations and best practices to accelerate movement out of poverty.


We invite you to join Grama Vidiyal and…

Get Inspired. Set a Goal. Make a Commitment.

Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:

Ultra Poor Graduation

PRA

Photo credit: BRAC

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>> Authored by Shameran Abed, Director, BRAC Microfinance Programme

Shameran Abed, BRAC’s Director of Microfinance, joined the Microfinance CEO Working Group in January. He and BRAC are welcome to additions to this collaboration. He joins the Working Group’s efforts to support the positive development of the microfinance industry and brings tremendous insigShameran Abedht into the discussion around pathways out of poverty.

This month, the results from six randomised controlled trials (RCTs), published in Science magazine highlighted a model of development that is an adaptable and exportable solution able to raise households from the worst forms of destitution and put them on to a pathway of self-reliance. The graduation approach — financial services integrated within a broader set of wrap-around services — is gaining steady recognition for its astonishing ability to transform the lives of the poorest.

These findings can be contrasted with the results of six RCTs published in January by the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, which cited limited evidence of “microcredit” transforming the lives of the poor.

In many ways, that was not surprising. There is only so much that microcredit alone can do to address a phenomenon as complex as poverty, especially within the rather short, 18-month timeframe of a research project. This partly explains the diversification most financial service providers have made into savings, microinsurance, financial education, and other models of financial inclusion that integrate different development services.

While the transformative effects of microcredit alone — or even microfinance — remain up for debate, it is now clear that access to savings and credit provided together with other wrap-around services not only provides a viable pathway out of poverty for the poor, they do so for the very poorest!

Following 30 years of work in building livelihoods for the poor, largely through microfinance and agricultural extension, BRAC learnt the hard way that we were not making effective poverty reduction gains for those most in need. We were consistently failing to reach the millions of households at the very bottom.

Classified as the “ultra poor,” this sub-segment of the extreme poor, who live on less than USD 0.80 per day, fail to meet their daily energy requirements, are chronically ill, and live on the fringes of society. In these circumstances where basic needs are unmet, microfinance alone can do little to provide a pathway out of poverty.

In 2002, BRAC developed a model designed to create livelihoods for the ultra-poor in a way that also addressed the other dimensions of abject poverty creating barriers to their development. Capitalising on our previous social safety net programme experience, BRAC’s Targeting the Ultra Poor programme (the basis of the graduation approach) combined asset transfer with livelihood development and social support.

GradBlogGraphic

For two years, clients receive an integrated package of cash stipends, an asset (such as a cow or chickens) with training, and basic healthcare. Early into the programme, clients cultivate strong savings behaviour, and learn the basics of financial management. The programme also includes a large social component: regular household visits from our staff and integration in the community.

Notably, the model in Bangladesh does integrate microcredit for some clients; 70 percent of the graduates in Bangladesh actually received their assets as “soft loans,” which they repay over the course of two years.

The results have been remarkable. Since 2002, 95 percent of the 1.4 million clients who have come through this programme have graduated from ultra-poverty. The programme is costly in one sense, because it’s grant-based and financially unsustainable, but the social returns are high and extend well beyond the end of the intervention period.  An RCT has shown that even years after members graduate, most continue to experience growth in their household income and well being.

The achievements of ultra-poor graduation are even greater because this is not a success story limited to Bangladesh. An initiative led by CGAP and the Ford Foundation sought to test the replicability of the BRAC model by piloting it in several contexts internationally.

The RCT results published in Science, which covered pilots in India, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Ghana, Honduras and Peru, show definitively that they were successful. In all six of the countries studied, all treatment households witnessed significant improvements across a range of indicators that continued beyond the end of their programmes. Today, the graduation approach is continuing to break ground with a range of other actors that include microfinance providers, multilateral agencies, NGOs (e.g. Fundacion Capital, UNHCR, Concern Worldwide) as well as governments looking to improve costly social safety net programmes that protect the poor from destitution, but fail to put them on a ladder out of poverty.

As a sector that has come under fire for failing to make conspicuous reductions in poverty, the success of ultra-poor graduation carries notable implications for the role that financial services can play in putting millions onto pathways out of extreme poverty.

One is a lesson to microfinance providers that, actually, the extreme poor can be extremely credit worthy – once the initial investment is made. Indeed, some of BRAC’s most reliable and disciplined microfinance clients are graduates from our ultra-poor programme. Microfinance institutions may not be the ones to make that investment, but they can help ensure that “graduates” of such programmes have a bridge that transitions them from ultra-poverty into mainstream microfinance.

Secondly, this model shows that financial services, when integrated within a broader set of wrap-around services, is unquestionably transformational, even for those in the most desperate forms of poverty.

Critics will likely ask, which are the most crucial elements? Is it financial access that is making wrap-around services transformational, or is it the wrap-around services that make financial access transformational?

The answer is most likely some combination of the two, but so long as this interaction is producing these results, I am satisfied in knowing that access to financial services remains a vital ingredient in the solution to extreme poverty.


Shameran Abed is the director of the BRAC microfinance programme, which serves more than five million clients in seven countries in Asia and Africa, and has total assets exceeding USD 1 billion.

Starting its work in the early 1970s, BRAC was one of the earliest known organisations to use the modern microfinance model of lending small amounts to groups of women. Working alongside several other development programmes, the success of the microfinance programme supported BRAC in its growth to be the largest development organisation in the world in terms of staff numbers.

Mr Abed also serves on the boards of BRAC Bank’s mobile financial services subsidiary, bKash, and Guardian Life Insurance. Additionally, he sits on the Microfinance Network Steering Committee and the World Economic Forum Financial Inclusion Steering Committee. Prior to joining BRAC, Mr Abed was a journalist and wrote primarily on political issues.

Mr Abed is a lawyer by training, having been made a barrister by the Honourable Society of Lincoln’s Inn in London, UK. He completed his undergraduate studies at Hamilton College in the United States, majoring in economics and minoring in political science.


BRAC launched a Campaign Commitment in 2014! We invite you also to…

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Register for our June 9th E-Workshop on Aging and Financial Inclusion

Lucía Urtecho Calderón, client of Financiera FAMA, sells candy and candied fruits in Mercado Carlos Roberto Huembes, Nicaragua on December 13, 2012 (Photo credit: Accion)

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How are you helping your clients to prepare for old age?

Join our next Campaign Commitment E-Workshop to learn about providing micropensions


JOIN US…
Tuesday, June 9th
at 10:00 AM (GMT-4)

…for the E-WORKSHOP
“Helping Clients Prepare for Old Age”


The Microcredit Summit Campaign is proud to present the next installment in our Campaign Commitment E-Workshops Series. Co-hosted with the Center for Financial Inclusion, which launched a Campaign Commitment in 2014, this E-Workshop will focus on helping clients to prepare for old age, including through providing micropensions.

The issue of aging is a new global reality, given increasing life expectancy, shrinking family sizes, and better health systems. Today, the microfinance community has the opportunity to be a leader in addressing this issue, helping people to prepare for their older years and providing financial services for older people. The Center for Financial Inclusion recently published a report titled Aging and Financial Inclusion: An Opportunity addressing the issue and identifying priority actions for financial service providers that will be presented during the E-Workshop.

Presenting Organizations
Center for Financial Inclusion
Sonja Kelly
Micro Pension Foundation
Parul Khanna
Helpage logo Help Age International
Eppu Mikkonen-Jeanneret

This webinar will be conducted in English. We will live-tweet using the hashtag #Commit100M in English, Spanish, Arabic and French.


The Center for Financial Inclusion launched a Campaign Commitment! We invite you also to…

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Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:

CRECER Commitment focuses on women and movement above national poverty line

A female client from CRECER is managing her financial assets. Read the press release about CRECER’s Commitment, which focuses on women and movement above national poverty line
Photo courtesy of CRECER Bolivia

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The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes CRECER Bolivia as the 53rd Campaign Commitment maker, joining a global coalition working to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty. A press release was issued on the Campaign website. CRECER was one of some 200 attendees that visited the Commitment Café during the 17th Microcredit Summit in Mexico last September to write on the Commitment Wall. (Read more about that.)

In their Commitment, Crédito con Educación Rural (CRECER) commits to support the Campaign’s goal in the following ways:

  • Continue to prioritize services for female clients: CRECER has 152,000 clients and will grow 3 percent per year to reach 166,000 clients by the end of 2017 while maintaining a rate of 80 percent women clients.
  • Clients in rural areas: Maintain a rate of 56 percent of total clients living in rural areas.
  • Strengthen financial education targeted towards women: By the end of 2015, have 75,000 female clients attend financial education events.
  • Support cervical cancer prevention: By the end of 2015, 25 percent of female clients will be receiving preventive screening each year, and it is expected that approximately 32,000 will benefit from this screening by the end of 2015.
  • Improve the quality of life: Of CRECER’s 152,000 clients, at least 65 percent live on less than double Bolivia’s poverty line ($2 per person per day), which is to say they live on less than $4 per day per person, while 41 percent are below the national poverty line. Our goal is that 10 percent of clients who are currently below the national poverty line raise their incomes from less than $2 to at least $4 per day, thus surpassing the poverty line. This process will be monitored with the Progress out of Poverty Index (PPI).

José Auad, CEO of CRECER, explains why they have joined the Microcredit Summit Campaign and this global coalition:

“Being a part of the Campaign…coincides with CRECER’s institutional philosophy. We are mindful of the responsibility that this signifies, as well as the responsibility we take on through the Commitment, for our fight against poverty began more than 25 years ago. We focus on a very vulnerable population, such as women in rural areas who, while truly experiencing poverty, are heroines in their daily struggle. We are convinced that by joining efforts and taking action…, we will reach the great goal of helping 100 million families around the world.”

CRECER is a development financial institution that provides financial and educational services to low-income women in Peru, in order to improve their quality of life and their families. It was founded in 1999 and its mission is to provide excellence and warmth with integrated financial products development services to improve the quality of life preferably women and their families. Read CRECER’s Campaign Commitment letter.

The Microcredit Summit Campaign looks forward to welcoming our new partners to the global coalition and sharing their progress towards the Commitment achievement at the 18th Microcredit Summit. The Campaign’s 100 Million Project is building a movement among financial service stakeholders committed to helping to end extreme poverty through: public statements of commitment to action, expanding practices to reliably measure movement out of extreme poverty, and promoting innovations and best practices to accelerate movement out of poverty.


We invite you to join CRECER and…

Get Inspired. Set a Goal. Make a Commitment.

Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:

Looking Back at 2014, the Year of Resilience

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>>By Larry Reed, Director, Microcredit Summit Campaign

Larry visits a CARD group in Tacloban

Larry visits a CARD group in Tacloban whose members are rebuilding with the help of CARD’s quick and appropriate response to the Typhoon Yolanda disaster.

I started 2014 in Tacloban, Philippines, where one of the worst storms of this century, Typhoon Yolanda (or Haiyan outside the Philippines), made landfall. I visited Tacloban 75 days after the Typhoon hit to see how the storm affected the lives of microfinance clients, and what role financial services could play in helping them get back on their feet.

In the Central Business District only a few shops had dared to reopen. The dangling power lines and intermittent electricity made regular operations a challenge.

When I traveled to the parts of town where people lived in poverty, I found something much worse. Yolanda struck these low lying areas the hardest, hit them first with her 100 mph winds and then with the storm surge that followed in her wake, uprooting everything that was not permanently attached to the ground and then carrying it out to sea as the waters receded.

Homes and everything in them had been taken away, so people rebuilt with scrap lumber and sheets of plastic. They established homes and businesses again, selling daily necessities from the side of their rebuilt houses.

A mix of charity and financial services played a key role in helping people get back on their feet. Aid organizations employed people to help clean their neighborhoods and the rest of the city, giving them daily cash wages.

Microfinance institutions like CARD and ASKI got back into the city as soon as they could, providing rice and medicines for their clients’ immediate needs, while also paying insurance claims, providing access to savings and issuing emergency rebuilding loans long before any commercial banks restarted operations.

I came away with great admiration for the strength and resilience developed by those that live with constant vulnerability and an appreciation that the role that fast and appropriate financial services, delivered with a human touch, can have in catalyzing that energy to rapidly rebuild destroyed neighborhoods.

In August of this year, I visited another great example of resilience, this one over a decade in the making. Several government ministries in Ethiopia banded together under the leadership of the Prime Minister to design a program that would build resiliency in the land and the people that regularly suffered from drought. International aid organizations united behind this plan that now covers over 5 million people.

With support from the MasterCard Foundation, the Campaign hosted a trip for government ministers and leaders of government anti-poverty programs from Ghana, Mozambique, and Malawi to visit this Productive Safety Net Program (PNSP) in Ethiopia.

Participants of the Innovations in Social Protection project

Participants of the Innovations in Social Protection project on a field visit in Ethiopia.

Under the PNSP, people living in poverty who are not able to work (the elderly, the disabled, and mothers with young children) receive regular cash payments in exchange for maintaining regular health checkups and keeping their children in school.

Those who can work participate in local public works programs decided on by the leadership of each village. These projects can include expanding school facilities and building health clinics; although, most of them involve work that improves the productive capacity of the land.

With technical support from NGOs with highly trained professional on staff, the villagers work together to build dams, retention ponds, irrigation channels and hillside terraces. They receive the payment for their work in accounts set up in local banks or microfinance institutions, which also provide loans to help them expand businesses that profit from the land’s increase productivity.

Those who started the program with the greatest poverty participate in an ultra-poor graduation programs that provides them with an asset transfer, a savings account, business training, mentoring, and access to credit.

We visited at the end of the rainy season, and we could easily see the transformation that the PNSP had brought to the land and its people. We looked down a valley filled with tall green plants, with every hillside terraced and water flowing into dams and ponds that would provide irrigation after the rains stopped. Land that used to struggle to provide one crop now provided two or three crops a year.

Almost a quarter of the people who had started with this public assistance program now no longer needed it. I tried to imagine what it must feel like for the men and women working together on the hillside, digging a retention pond together, to look down the hill and see every part of the valley filled with green plants that would provide food for their animals and income for their livelihoods and to know that, not only were they and their children better off, but their entire community was better off because of the work they had done.

In September, we helped to assemble almost 900 people from 60 different countries in Merida, Mexico, for the 17th Microcredit Summit. As we gathered in the land of the ancient Maya who envisaged a new world coming into being at this time, we imagined a world where all people have access to financial products and services they need to protect against vulnerability and invest in opportunity.

Opening Ceremony - Prof Yunus_453x604

“Poor people didn’t create poverty. It’s the system that created the poverty. And, if we want to end poverty, we have to change the system.”

Muhammad Yunus issued the challenge for the Summit in his opening talk. “Poor people didn’t create poverty. It’s the system that created the poverty,” he told us. “And, if we want to end poverty, we have to change the system.”

During our 5 plenary sessions and 40 workshops, we heard from innovative thinkers and doers who are working to change the system. We discussed ideas and formed partnerships to begin or expand innovative programs that link conditional cash transfers to savings groups; extend agricultural value chains to small scale producers; provide health education, financing, and services in group meetings of microfinance clients; and employ digital technology that delivers payments and other financial services at a fraction of the cost of moving cash.

Together we made Commitments for what we would do to help extend financial services to all and help speed the end of extreme poverty. Then we closed by celebrating the real heroes of this work: the men and women who employ these services in order to earn and save enough to provide for their families and build a better future for their children.

I just completed my last trip of the year to the Inclusive Finance India Summit and saw a different type of resilience on display. Microfinance institutions in India have been devastated by the Andhra Pradesh crisis, where rapid growth in lending led to over-borrowing, client defaults, and a harsh response from the state government that halted collection efforts.

The sector is now growing rapidly again, enough that a few observers are worried that there may be some areas of overheating in the state of Karnataka, where many MFIs have moved.

Almost all the delegates I spoke with expressed excitement about new regulations announced by the Reserve Bank of India, which create a category of Small Finance Bank that can take deposits and make loans. The regulations also create a new category of Payments Bank to allow for institutions that make money from payment transaction, rather than from intermediating savings and credit.

A local community health volunteer trained and supervised by Bandhan, an Indian MFI, meets with members of a local self-help group and their families. (Photo courtesy of Johnson & Johnson)

A local community health volunteer trained and supervised by Bandhan, an Indian MFI, meets with members of a local self-help group and their families. (Photo courtesy of Johnson & Johnson)

In a dinner session I had with leaders from MFIs, I heard a lot of discussion about how they might transform their operations under these new regulations to provide a broader ranges of services to their clients. It will be interesting to watch this period of creative destruction that will take place in India as MFIs, mobile phone operators, and banks all adapt to the new regulations. I was glad to hear in our dinner the creativity and passion of many leaders to use these new opportunities to expand the services they provide to those living in poverty.

And now, as the year comes to a close, so does news of another Super Typhoon hitting the Philippines. This time, people knew about the power of storm surges and moved to higher ground before the storm struck, resulting in a much lower loss of life.

But still, thousands of people will go back to where they lived and find their houses and businesses destroyed. The fortunate ones will find an officer of a microfinance institution waiting for them, asking them what they need to get back on their feet.

On behalf of everyone at the Microcredit Summit Campaign, thank you for taking an active role in this global movement to bring appropriate financial services to those who struggle against poverty and vulnerability. It is our great honor and privilege to be working with you as we join with others to help bring an end to extreme poverty in our towns, our countries and our world.

May you be filled this holiday season with joy as you share the love of your family and reflect on the new financial system that we are creating together.

Sincerely,

Larry Reed

E-Workshop: How to Build Savings Groups and Other Breakthroughs in Financial Inclusion

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Photo courtesy of Jeffrey Ashe

Please note the date for this E-Workshop has changed to
Thursday, December 11th at 10:00 AM (GMT-4). 

Join us for an E-Workshop titled How to Build Savings Groups and Other Breakthroughs in Financial Inclusion

The Carsey School of Public Policy and Fundación Capital are co-hosting with the Microcredit Summit Campaign the next E-Workshop which will share insights on starting and scaling up savings groups. Both Carsey and Fundación Capital announced Campaign Commitments in 2014, and this latest E-Workshop will help microfinance and financial inclusion stakeholders to improve outreach and service with savings groups.
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What time in your country?

Join us for a discussion with Jong-Hyon Shin (Fundación Capital) and Jeffrey Ashe, which is moderated by William Maddocks (Carsey School of Public Policy). We will be discussing effective ways of forming savings groups and describe 2-hour trainings that Jong-Hyon led in the Dominican Republic.

The speakers will also share insights on linking savings groups and conditional cash transfer programs (see the recording of the Workshop titled Going to Scale: Savings Groups, Conditional Cash Transfers, and Financial Inclusion at the 17th Microcredit Summit), with the example of collaboration with ADOPEM and Fundación Capital in the Dominican Republic.

Through these valuable insights, you will gain a better understanding of the essential steps to start and scale up savings groups, and see how savings groups can contribute to financial inclusion and the end of extreme poverty.

Organization
Name
Carsey School of Public Policy
William Maddocks
Program Director, Microenterprise and Development
Moderator
Fundacion Capital
Jong-Hyon Shin
Country Project Coordinator
Carsey School of Public Policy
Jeffrey Ashe
Fellow
Co-Author of
In Their Own Hands: How Savings Groups Are Revolutionizing Development
Photo courtesy of Fundación Capital "What’s most significant about savings groups is that they are designed to be wholly managed by villagers themselves; by and large, they function as they are intended to function; and they reach impoverished people in remote rural areas who would otherwise go without any financial services, even microfinance."

Photo courtesy of Fundación Capital
“What’s most significant about savings groups is that they are designed to be wholly managed by villagers themselves; by and large, they function as they are intended to function; and they reach impoverished people in remote rural areas who would otherwise go without any financial services, even microfinance.” —David Bornstein, New York Times 


Join us for this exciting discussion to gain a deeper understanding of savings groups and hear from practitioners and researchers about their challenges, gains, and the practical applications! 


Follow this e-workshop and the Campaign’s 100 Million Project:

Learn about the 100 Million Project Project and Campaign Commitments.

The 100 Million Project: Commitment to Action at the Summit

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Participant writing on the Wall

A  Summit participant writes on the Commitments Wall

Where to find Commitments at the Summit?

The 17th Microcredit Summit in Mérida was a huge success, bringing together some 1000 people from 75 countries and featuring 162 speakers and presenters in 7 plenary sessions and 35 workshops. Throughout sessions delegates had the opportunity to hear about the Campaign Commitments their colleagues from other organizations weremaking ahead of the Summit. Launched in 2013 with 18 original Commitments, we celebrated together the 36 new organizations joining them now 2014. Many present were inspired to become leaders in the movement as well and joined (or reaffirmed their role in the Campaign) by stating their own at the Commitment Café. Join them by making your own Campaign Commitment to action! Write to mycommitment@microcreditsummit.org or visit our Online Commitment Form.

Full Commitment wall

51 organizations, including Plan International, the Rotary and the Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection from Ghana, wrote on the Commitment Wall.

Throughout the Summit, around 200 attendees visited the Commitment Café every day and 51 new Commitments were written on the Commitment Wall. The Café and the Wall were the gathering area for Summit delegates to join the Campaign, by stating their Commitment to actions that contribute to the global movement to end extreme poverty. There, they had the opportunity to meet with Commitment coaches who helped them form their Commitments. Commitment Makers then posted their actions on the Commitment Wall – creating a dramatic and inspiring range of actors and actions that will help move the industry toward ending extreme poverty.

Commitment Coach

A Commitment Coach is helping a Summit Participant to state her Commitment at the Cafe.

At the Closing Plenary, Summit delegates together with Mohammad Yunus, Larry Reed, John Hatch and Carmen Velasco celebrated the efforts of all Committed Organizations. We particularly acknowledged the 12 organizations who met their 2013 Commitment. The 36 Commitments announced in 2014 were also applauded and represent a great step towards galvanizing the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of poverty.

What Commitment Makers say about Campaign Commitments

During the Summit, we conducted interviews with representatives from Commitment Makers to learn more about their Commitment. They shared with us their own Commitments, their current progress on those actions and also told us why it is important for their organization to join the movement to end extreme poverty.

Yves Moury,  Founder and CEO, Fundación Capital (see his short Interview at the Video Corner here)

“We need massive alliances among all sectors of civil society. We invite governments, banks, private companies, civil society institutions to join us for the magnificent objective of ending extreme poverty by 2030.”

Anne Hastings, Microfinance CEO Working Group (see her short interview at the Video Corner here)

“I am here at the Summit because the 8 CEOs I represent have made Commitments. We are here to learn what we can about partnerships that we need to be building and how to collaborate better with the rest of the sector. The challenge for the microfinance sector today is to demonstrate results and especially results in reaching and assisting the extremely poor to get out of poverty.”

William Maddocks,  Program Director, Sustainable Microenterprise and Development , Carsey School of Public Policy

“We want to be part of this Campaign. Making this commitment is an opportunity for us to tell more people about what we do and to support the work of the Campaign. We want our voice to be a part of this Campaign.”

Closing Ceremony: we celebrated 2013 and 2014 Commitments.

Closing Ceremony: we celebrated 2013 and 2014 Commitments. Click here to see all Committed organizations.

Jared Penner,  Head of the Education Division Child and Youth Finance International: “Commitments are made within a community of believers that think this is something incredibly important to advance the industry and these targets give us something to really aspire towards. They are not legally-binding commitments, but there is something that allows us to keep each other accountable and see how things are advancing within our own operations.”


What you can do today

Providing a Safety Net to Ten Million People

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Richard Leftley, CEO of MicroEnsure, writes about the experiences that helped lead to the development of a safety net for the most vulnerable and how far they have come in fulfilling their Commitment to the Campaign.


- Image courtesy of MicroEnsure

Image courtesy of MicroEnsure

Join us in Mexico for the 17th Microcredit Summit in Mexico this September 3-5.

Richard Leftley will be joined from leaders in the microinsurance sub-sector for a workshop on microinsurance.

http://17microcreditsummit.org/


Over the years many of the microfinance leaders that I have met have told me of that one chance interaction that changed the course of their lives and resulted in them embarking on a journey to help millions of people be transformed and lifted out of poverty.

My moment was in the summer of 2001 in a village in Northern Zambia; one of the ladies I was talking to had become frustrated by my ignorance as to why she had experienced such a seeming boom and bust in her fortunes. From among her few possessions she produced a child’s Chutes & Ladders board and she explained that she was just trying to work her way out of poverty. She had succeeded earlier in her life having lived in an apartment in the capital and driven a car, but here she was back in the village with seemingly nothing to her name.

She explained that the microfinance loans she received helped accelerate her out of poverty like the ladders in the game, but then she looked at me and explained that no one was there when disaster struck causing her to slide back into poverty just as the chutes in the game return you to your starting place. What is today MicroEnsure was founded a few months later in partnership with the team at Opportunity International.

Twelve years later it is a real pleasure to make a Campaign Commitment to join with other microfinance leaders to help lift 100 million people out of extreme poverty; our contribution will be to provide a safety net to 10 million people in 15 countries so that they do not slip back following the death of a breadwinner, sickness of a child or following a natural disaster.

At the beginning of 2014 when we made this Commitment MicroEnsure was serving just 4 million people, but I am pleased to report that by the end of May we had enrolled 8.2 million customers (a growth of over 200%) and we are well on our way to matching or even exceeding our commitment by the end of the first quarter 2015. This rapid growth has come not only from our MFI partners but most significantly from the mobile network operators that we have partnered with in Africa and Asia some of which are signing up in excess of 250,000 new clients each and every week.

The breakthrough in working with telco’s (telecommunications providers) came when we stopped trying to sell insurance through them but instead realised that we could dramatically affect customer loyalty to the telco; let me explain. You see, none of us wake up wanting to buy insurance and if you are poor the idea of a product that you may need at some time months or years from now really makes no sense in the present.

However we know that our clients do wake up worried about what would happen if their husband died, their kids got sick, or a disaster struck. We also knew that telco’s are suffering from low customer loyalty with most subscribers using multiple SIM cards to make prepaid calls. We simply combined answering clients’ fear with the need of the telco’s for increased loyalty and in doing so we convinced the telco to give their loyal subscribers free insurance in return for spending more airtime on their network. The subscribers were happy to do so because their fears were being addressed for free in return for simply making more of their calls on one network. Everyone wins.

Interestingly we have also used this same idea to significantly drive the mobilisation of deposits in MFIs across Africa. Most deposit accounts have tiny balances that are loss-making for the MFI yet we know that the poor save money in a myriad of ways. It just seemed obvious to us that offering interest to depositors was simply not attractive enough to give customers a reason to choose the bank over  informal savings mechanisms. So we tried giving away free insurance if you saved.  As you saved more – $50, $60, $70 – you earned more free insurance coverage. We were delighted to see 200% increases in deposit rates clustered around these targets.

Achieving our goals will not be simple. We continue to rely upon partnership in order to provide our services and we are always on the lookout for MFIs, telco’s and others that provide services to the mass market. We would love to hear from anyone who wants to join with us on this mission. This kind of rapid growth also requires capital and we were delighted to announce last month that AXA and Sanlam Insurance Companies joined Opportunity, IFC, Omidyar Network and Telenor as investors in MicroEnsure bringing together key strategic partnerships with the funds required to continue scaling.

I often dream of returning to that village to find the Chutes & Ladders lady. I have no idea what I would say to her, but I would love the chance to simply say thanks for starting us out on this journey. I wonder if she knows she was the spark that has helped 10 million people like her find a safety net against the chutes they find along their own journeys out of poverty?


MicroEnsure announced their Campaign Commitment as:

  • MicroEnsure commits to reach 10 million clients with insurance services by the end of the first quarter of 2015.
  • MicroEnsure commits to expand its current reach into 15 countries by launching work in 5 new countries by the end of the first quarter of 2015

Join MicroEnsure and State your Campaign Commitment

Join MicroEnsure in the global coalition to help 100 million families lift themselves out of poverty – state your Campaign Commitment at mycommitment@microcreditsummit.org

Need additional guidance in formulating your own Campaign Commitment? Refer to our Commitment Development Toolkit.

Be social with us on Facebook and Twitter (@MicroCredSummit) using the hashtags #Commit100M and #100MGoal

Graduating Families out of Ultra-Poverty (E-Workshop Recap)

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Due to technical difficulties, the webinar recording function started late. We apologize for this inconvenience and have made a summary and the presenter’s slides available to you.

BRAC client

Image courtesy of BRAC


Webinar resources


Larry Reed, director of the Microcredit Summit Campaign, moderated an engaging discussion about the Graduation Model pioneered by BRAC, an international development organization based in Bangladesh, that included Sadna Samaranayake (Program Manager of the Ultra-Poor Graduation Program at BRAC USA), Carine Roenen (Executive Director of Fonkoze in Haiti) and Raymond Serios (Special Projects Manager at Negros Women for Tomorrow Foundation).

Sadna Samaranayake, BRAC Ultra-Poor Graduation Program

Sadna opened by describing BRAC’s Ultra-Poor Graduation Approach which targets ultra-poor households and follows a process of focused interventions carefully sequenced to “graduate” households out of ultra-poverty. While the World Bank uses the $1.25 per day income threshold to define extreme poverty, BRAC understands the ultra-poor as those in the bottom half of earnings among those below the $1.25 a day line.

Sadna explained that the first step in the process to graduating households from ultra-poverty is to carefully target and select families for program participation. This requires community mapping and wealth ranking exercises to determine which community members are in the most need.

Once chosen to participate in the program, clients receive a transfer of productive assets and a cash stipend. Sadna explained that productive assets can be livestock, seeds for planting, or small goods for enterprise. The cash stipend allows clients flexibility to start improving their livelihood while beginning to generate an income from the productive assets.

Next the clients receive training and they start to generate an income for themselves. As time progresses, clients are encouraged to save money and are given access to appropriate health care. Ultimately, the objective of the graduation approach is to ensure that all families are better integrated into the social fabric of the community and are generating enough sustainable income to conquer ultra-poverty.

Graduation occurs over a period of 24 months when households achieve set economic and social goals including not having a reported food deficit in the past year, having multiple sources of income, owning livestock/poultry, having a sanitary latrine and clean drinking water, having cash savings and school age children attending school. Over the past 12 years, BRAC has graduated 1.4 million people, mainly in Bangladesh and has committed to graduating 250,000 more families by the end of 2016.

Carine Roenen, Fonkoze

Carine followed by illustrating the challenges of implementing a graduation model in Haiti. The Fokonze approach is an adaptation of the BRAC model with slight changes for the context for working in Haiti. Fonkoze has reached 62,735 clients with loans, and graduated 2,900 clients from ultra-poverty. Currently, Fokonze is hoping to expand its outreach in Haiti to graduate more households out of ultra-poverty.

Raymond Serios, Negros Women for Tomorrow

Raymond used his opportunity to interview both Sadna and Carine about the process of implementing a graduation model in his context in the Philippines. Raymond inquired about how BRAC and Fonkoze choose productive assets with the households. Carine responded that it depends on the skills of the client and should be something that she is already familiar with or willing to learn.

Larry then moderated a discussion among the panelists based on questions submitted by webinar participants. Some of the questions focused on monitoring and evaluation processes to track progress toward graduation. Others touched similarly on impact in the long term. It was a lively discussion that included an optional time extension after the official schedule ended to continue discussions. (See all the questions and comments in the webinar chat.)


We would like to thank all of the panelists and all of the participants who attended the webinar and participated via the chat and Q&A functions. We invite you to comment on this post to continue the discussion about the graduation model and further share ideas.

We also invite you to explore the links below to the recording of the webinar, presentations from BRAC and Fokonze, as well as the Robin Burgess report about the impact of the graduation model program on employment choices.

We hope you will join us for our next e-workshop “Instilling Confidence in Poverty Measurement: The New PPI Certification” on Tuesday, June 24th at 10:00 AM (EDT/GMT-4) and featuring panelists Frank Ballard (Grameen Foundation), Analí Oda Salcedo (Planet Rating), and Chiara Pescatori (MicroFinanza Rating).

Webinar Resources:


E-Workshops are hosted by the 100 Million Project of the Microcredit Summit Campaign and strive to feature the work of organizations who have announced Campaign Commitments to take specific, measurable and time-bound actions that demonstrate their commitment to the end of extreme poverty. Are you Committed?  Find out how to share your Commitment to the end of extreme poverty.

BRAC declares Campaign Commitment to graduate 250,000 households from ultra-poverty

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Summary: The Microcredit Summit Campaign welcomes BRAC as the newest Campaign Commitment member, joining a global coalition to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty. Read the full Press Release.
BRAC group meeting

Image courtesy of BRAC

BRAC is a development organization founded in Bangladesh in 1972 and has since become one of the largest NGOs in the world in terms of employees and number of clients served, spreading successful poverty alleviating solutions born in the developing world to other countries. In 2002, BRAC launched the Ultra-Poor Graduation Program, which aimed at lifting the ultra poor out of their situation of poverty so that they can access mainstream development services such as microfinance. The program targets extremely deprived women and their households, and maintains BRAC’s holistic approach to development by providing targeted asset grants, skill training and healthcare support. Since 2002, 1.4 million households have already graduated from BRAC’s Ultra-Poor Graduation Program. With this tremendous success, BRAC plans to continue the spread of this model to reach even more households around the globe.

When asked about the origins of BRAC’s Ultra-Poor Graduation Program, Program Manager Sadna Samaranayake responded,“The extreme poor, living on less than $1.25 a day, are far from homogenous. Among them are households trapped in the direst forms of destitution, who are chronically hungry, lack assets, income, or support from their communities. It was to address the needs of these populations, the ultra-poor at the margins and beyond the reach of microfinance and other development programs, that BRAC pioneered what is now known as the Graduation approach. Even the poorest can “graduate” from ultra-poverty with a set of carefully tailored interventions designed to help achieve increased incomes, food security and better resilience overall. A complement to MFI, NGO and government strategies to reach the ultra-poor, BRAC is committed to advancing knowledge and implementation of the Graduation approach.”

Some key excerpts of BRAC’s Campaign Commitment:

  • In Bangladesh alone, BRAC commits to graduating 250,000 households out of ultra-poverty by the end of 2016.
  • BRAC commits to publishing an in-depth implementation guide in September 2014 to help governments, microfinance institutions and NGOs execute their own ultra-poor graduation programs. Additionally, BRAC commits to providing technical assistance and consultation where requested to governments, NGOs and MFIs looking to implement the graduation approach.
  • BRAC commits to hosting a national conference on the graduation approach in a country where BRAC operates in 2014.
  • BRAC commits to hosting annual Immersion and Training Visits in Bangladesh for interested parties including policy makers, microfinance institutions, multilateral funders, and donors to witness the graduation program in action. During these visits, participants will get an in-depth look at the program, from field staff training ultra-poor women on how to realize a return on their new assets, to the healthcare, savings and social integration elements of the approach.

The next round of these Immersion Training Visits are on the weeks of August 18th and August 25th. Contact Sadna Samaranayake at sadna@bracusa.org to register.

Read the BRAC Commitment Letter.


Join BRAC and State your Campaign Commitment

Join us in the global coalition to help 100 million families lift themselves out of poverty – state your Campaign Commitment at mycommitment@microcreditsummit.org

Need additional guidance in formulating your own Campaign Commitment? Refer to our Commitment Development Toolkit.

Be social with us on Facebook and Twitter (@MicroCredSummit) using the hashtags #Commit100M and #100MGoal

Paths to Ending Extreme Poverty by 2030: What will it take?

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Designing products and programs with the poorest and most vulnerable first in mind will lead to benefits for everyone. EspañolFrançais Continue reading

Initial Reports of Affected Filipino MFI Staff, Clients, and Branches

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We encourage you to make a donation to any one of these MFIs EspañolFrançais Continue reading