Global Money Week at the 18th Microcredit Summit with Luis Fernando Sanabria

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


18th Microcredit Summit & 2016 Global MOney Week Interview Series

Luis Fernando Sanabria, COO of Fundación Paraguaya, interviewed by Jared Penner, director of thought leadership and consultancy at Child & Youth Finance International in the Netherlands.


Luis Fernando Sanabria, COO of Fundación Paraguaya, tells about his organization’s commitment to serving the youth of Paraguay. He highlights the importance of the youth in Paraguay, noting that half the country’s population is under 30 years old. “They are not only the future, but also the present — especially of our economy,” he points out.

Fundación Paraguaya focuses on developing a self-sufficient school model so that the youth will be prepared to have a successful in life. The organization encourages youth to engage in micro-enterprises and works with other organizations to develop a supportive ecosystem.

“Everything we learn in microfinance and in financial literacy,” said Sanabria, “we put it in our self-sufficient school model. Those are self-sufficient schools for very poor people. We run microenterprises on the campuses of those schools, and the microenterprises are run by teachers and students. They serve 2 purposes: first one is to generate income to sustain the school but second, and perhaps the more important objective, is to better train students to be successful in life…They learn not only about production but about marketing, accounting, packaging — everything they need to run a real enterprise when they graduate.”

Fundación Paraguaya commits to next five years is to creating partnerships with other organizations and help 30,000 families in Paraguay to leave extreme poverty.

Video Corner | Shazia Abbas on microfinance creating entrepreneurs

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


18th Microcredit Summit Video Corner Interview Series

Shazia Abbas, CEO of Micro Options in Pakistan, interviewed by Miranda Beshara, editor of the Arabic Microfinance Gateway.


Shazia Abbas of Micro Options (Pakistan) discusses her organization, the role of microfinance to help end poverty, and the lessons learned at the 18th Microcredit Summit with Miranda Beshara, editor of the Arabic Microfinance Gateway. Micro Options provides microcredit services for agriculture, livestock, and alternative energy (i.e., solar and bio-gas), combining access to capital with skills training with a focus on women and youth.

Abbas says that the Summit is a great forum and the biggest networking event for the region and globally. On her experience in Abu Dhabi, she appreciates “learning how other people are doing this work differently, and especially the opportunities we can leverage. That was wonderful. Every session is very important, and I was confused which to pick and not to pick,” Abbas adds with a chuckle. “I will definitely take some learning that I can cooperate at my organization so that we can deliver even better.”

Abbas echoes Professor Muhammad Yunus on the role of microfinance, stressing that access to capital and finance should be a fundamental human right. “If you are educated but you don’t have access to employment,” says Abbas, “you can become an entrepreneur. We provide social and economic development opportunity especially to rural areas and women.”

She continues, “We believe microcredit is directly linked and can directly impact on poverty, but implementation needs to be strategized properly. Ultimately, provision of capital and using this capital in a way that you make people entrepreneurs and make people stand on their own feet.” She concludes that this is how microfinance can “accelerate” people out of poverty.

Ghana: What lies ahead

Representatives from REST Ethiopia lead a group discussion with a graduation program participant during the Innovations in Social Protection and Livelihoods Development program in 2014.

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


>>Authored by Paul Gostomski, Microcredit Summit Campaign Program Intern

The Microcredit Summit Campaign recently spoke with Mawutor Ablo, director of Social Protection at Ghana’s Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection, and also a participant in the Campaign’s Field Learning Program last year, Innovations in Social Protection and Livelihoods Development.

The program invited representatives from Ghana, Malawi, and Mozambique on a trip to observe leading social protection programs in Ethiopia and Mexico. In our discussion with Mr. Mawutor, we spoke about the changes made to Ghana’s social protection programs since we last met and what changes may be made in the future to increase the reach of the programs and strengthen outcomes for Ghana’s poorest.

The Ghana National Household Registry

In May 2014, the World Bank continued its support to Ghana through a credit of US$50 million to Ghana’s Finance Ministry with payments dispersed annually from 2015 to 2017.

The funds are directed to the Ghana Social Opportunities Project, which aims to extend Ghana’s Labor-Intensive Public Works (LIPW) program from 49 to 60 of Ghana’s 216 districts. LIPW also aims to expand the reach of grants from 100,000 to 150,000 poor households through the Livelihood Empowerment against Poverty (LEAP) program.

In addition, the social protection systems will be strengthened through improved targeting and the establishment of the Ghana National Household Registry (GNHR).

Ato Berhanu Woldemichael in a meeting

Mr. Ato Berhanu Woldemichael, as acting State Minister with the Food Security Directorate, oversees much of the government’s role in LEAP and LIPW.

Before the implementation of the household registry system, both LIPW and LEAP screened candidate households in selected districts independently. This has not caused an overlap yet, but with the extension of the Ghana Social Opportunities Project and its intended scaling up of both programs, overlap is inevitable, leading to possible disbursement conflicts between the two programs.

The GNHR will create a database that optimizes methods used in finding and selecting program candidates through a universal survey useful for multiple social protection programs in selecting participating households. Simply put, the GNHR and its universal survey will represent a more efficient and comprehensive method for selecting households for inclusion in the national social protection programs.

Mr. Mawutor expects the registry to improve the ability to target and reach the poorest in Ghana. He compared the registry to that of the successful Cadastro Unico, the national registry of Brazil established in 2001. Three years after Cadastro Unico was created, a study showed that the poorest quartile of the population received 80 percent of all social protection programs’ benefits.

By way of comparison, the cash transfer programs in place prior to the unified registry together distributed only 64 percent of the total benefits to the poorest quartile. This improvement in targeting is something Mr. Mawutor hopes to see take place in GNHR by reducing what he termed inclusion error — the participation of households living above the targeted poverty level — in programs like LEAP and LIPW.

The Move to Mobile Money

Leaders in charge of implementing Ghana’s social protection programs are interested in finding the most efficient way to distribute the cash transfers that are at the center of these initiatives. Currently, the most common method of disbursement is through smart cards. Here, recipients of a cash transfer can go to the post office or another government entity with their smart card to have their payment added to their smart card.

Ghana would like to move from this strategy because of the high transaction costs associated with it. Also, this method does not allow recipients to transfer the money they receive to, for example, a family member in need. Instead, Ghana would like mobile money to be the primary form of receiving cash transfers.

Ghana has already partnered with MTN, a mobile network operator from South Africa, and has thus far reached a point where about 10 percent of its payments are disbursed through mobile systems.

Hoping to expand this number, Mr. Mawutor told us that Ghana would be increasing its total number of providers to four companies this year. With the expansion, Mr. Mawutor hopes to make mobile banking more accessible to poorer areas by increasing the overall number of local branches across the country.

The addition of three new operators would also produce significant returns from the added competition to the market, producing incentives for each company to provide the best service.

Mr. Mawutor Ablo during the Innovations in Social Protection, along with the Hon. Dela Sowa, Deputy Minister of Gender, Children, and Social Protection. Together they have great responsibility for the social protection programing in Ghana.

Growth by Efficiency

Social protection programs in Ghana have made many changes in the past few years and they all seem to focus on efficiency. Both the establishment of the Ghana National Household Registry and the move to mobile money aim to cut the costs associated with these programs. The registry intends to better target those among the poorest in Ghana for participation in the social protection program and reduce the costs to serve them by removing redundancies between the various initiatives.

The move to mobile money aims to make funds more accessible to beneficiaries, increasing the potential for positive outcomes resulting from the programs. With these changes, it is clear Ghana is dedicated to maximizing results.

We look forward to continuing to follow new developments from Ghana over time and continuing to be a close supporter of the work of Ghana’s Ministry of Gender, Children, and Social Protection.


Get Inspired. Set a Goal. Make a Commitment.

Join the movement to help 100 million families lift themselves out of extreme poverty:


Related reading

Social protection: innovative programs deliver financial services at scale

Participants of the Innovations in Social Protection project

Participants of the 2014 Innovations in Social Protection and Livelihoods Development initiative

Lea en español *** Lisez en français


Pathway

Agricultural value chains that reach to small scale producers


>>Authored by Jesse Marsden, Manager, Research and Operations

April is the Month of MicrofinanceLearn more

April is the Month of Microfinance
Learn more

We at the Microcredit Summit Campaign have advocated for scaling up the full range of microfinance services (savings, credit, insurance, and beyond) as one sector’s contribution to a broader effort to end extreme poverty. Experience of the development community suggests that ending extreme poverty will take a multifaceted approach that matches and sequences the right combination of financial and non-financial services with an ever-varying set of binding constraints faced by individuals living in extreme poverty.

Some 40 years have passed since modern microfinance got underway with micro loans to villagers in Jobra, and innovation and learning have helped micro-financial services and interventions greatly evolve to now include a wide array of forms and functions. Last August, the Microcredit Summit Campaign led a learning tour to deeply investigate some of the newest and most promising innovations in delivering micro-financial services to those living in extreme poverty.

Six delegates representing ministries that oversee social protection programs in Ghana, Malawi, and Mozambique took a twelve-day journey with us across two continents in advance of the 17th Microcredit Summit. They observed innovative approaches for social protection programs to address the causes and symptoms of extreme poverty.

The learning and exposure visit, called “Innovations in Social Protection and Livelihoods Development,” was an initiative led by our 100 Million Project in partnership with The MasterCard Foundation. Delegates to the program from participating learned first-hand what is working well and what challenges exist for program implementers in Ethiopia and Mexico.

Policy makers then developed innovation plans for 2015 to act on lessons learned from their trip after returning home. In one example, the Malawi delegation, based on their innovation plan, fully redesigned their social protection plan (which they were preparing before their trip) to include savings schemes and digital transfer technologies to support implementation. This will have an impact on some 860,000 households (or more than 4 million individuals) living in extreme poverty served by the program.

Rainy season roads

Rainy season roads in Ethiopia

Ethiopia’s Productive Safety Net Program

The Ministry of Agriculture oversees the implementation of the Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP) in Ethiopia which is designed to address food insecurity, a key development and poverty issue in the country. PSNP uses a cash transfer process in combination with participation in a public works scheme, generating water and soil related improvements in remote areas of the country in order to build the capacity of drought stricken areas to endure weather related shocks. In return for working in a 10-person group for a set number of days per month, a monthly cash transfer is granted for six months each year that the individual participants.

These groups of 10 people select a public works improvement project to implement from a set of options developed by PSNP administrators based on the local conditions. Options often include projects to control and prevent the erosion of farming or grazing areas, rain capture systems to mitigate the impact of drought, and even infrastructure improvements such as bridges or access roads. An engineering expert is assigned to each group to ensure quality construction of the improvement and safety of the structure built.

Participants are considered “graduated” from PSNP once her or his status as “food secure” is verified by the Ministry of Agriculture, which states that “A household will be graduate when, in the absence of receiving PSNP transfers, it can meet its food needs for all 12 months and is able to withstand modest shocks.”

The Relief Society of Tigray

The delegates traveled to the northern Tigray Region of Ethiopia to visit public works completed or underway as part of PSNP outside the city of Mek’ele. The Relief Society of Tigray (REST), one of the largest NGO microfinance implementers in the country, hosted the delegation and our visits to sites where REST acts as the local partner to PSNP. Ministry and REST representatives highlighted this effective government-NGO partnership as a key to the program’s success.

The delegation visited a number of key water-related improvements and some of these images depict the massive amount of work conducted over the last seven years since the initiation of the program.

Mexico’s Conditional Cash Transfer Program

The learning program continued in Mexico where the delegation enjoyed a day of briefings, exploring the Oportunidades program (now known as Prospera), Mexico’s conditional cash transfer program (CCT) overseen by PRONAFIM in the State of Yucatán.

The briefing focused on the structures and relationships necessary within the policy framework to make Prospera work under the national-level Ministry of Social Development (SEDESOL). The delegates learned how the national development bank, BANSEFI, plays an integral role as a facilitator of cash transfers and an accounting hub for the program, and how important it is for the national government and regulatory authorities to be involved throughout the implementation of the program.

The delegation also met participants of the program Jovenes con Oportunidades (“Youth with Opportunities”), which provides higher education scholarships to youth of families participating in other social development programs of PRONAFIM. The families we met were participating in a health clinic through SEDESOL, enabling their college-age children to receive scholarships to attend universities or polytechnic schools. In this way, the program contributes to improved health while it supports access to higher education among low-income families.

The delegation spent the next day visiting the Cristo Rey Cooperative in the town of Izamal. Cristo Rey is a CCT distributor, partnered with BANSEFI, for the Prospera program. The delegation learned about their operations including a deep dive into the structure and aims of the child savings program that serves over 3,000 children. The presentation also included a look at the IT infrastructure Cristo Rey requires to be an effective partner in Prospera.

What we learned

The purpose of the learning tour was not to learn everything there is to know about successfully using social protection interventions to end extreme poverty. Not everything is known yet. But, it was an opportunity for the six members of the delegation — all of whom work with similar financial and social interventions in their home countries — to develop new ideas based on evidence of success in order to help reshape or improve the programs they oversee. As mentioned, Malawi has completely re-envisioned their program. Others have also begun asking how they can access a new learning tour looking at the use of digital solutions to help deliver programs.

The picture of microfinance is one of innovation and creatively combining services in very intentional ways to meet a huge variety of binding constraints faced by those living in extreme poverty. Agricultural financial tools, cash transfers, graduation model programs, and technology all featured prominently in the learning tour, and these are showing exciting promise in meeting the needs of the extreme poor at scale and in ways that still remain flexible. We look forward to exploring these pathways more!

Learn more about the 100 Million Project.

Relevant resources

Serving children and youth in your work to end poverty

Lea en español (traducido por Google) *** Lisez en français (traduit par Google)
Thank you to the Microfinance Gateway for translating this to Arabic!


Nearly 70 individuals joined us on March 12th to celebrate Global Money Week and engage with representatives from AGFUND and Child & Youth Finance International, exploring strategies and specific programs to include children and youth in their work to help end poverty.

The discussion went in depth on major challenges facing microfinance practitioners looking to effectively and safely serve this group but also highlighted several leading examples of how those challenges may be overcome.

CYFI_logo

Jared Penner, manager for education and engagement, spoke about the importance of not overlooking children and youth in the financial inclusion map and underscored the importance of early exposure to, and the deeper resulting understanding from, using financial tools — particularly savings accounts. Ignacio Bianco, also with CYFI, talked about their SchoolBank Program in which they work with education and banking partners to deliver specially designed savings accounts to children at their schools.

AGFUND_279x172Nasser Al-Khatani, executive director of AGFUND, presented some foundational lessons that have been developed into guidelines for how AGFUND’s member banks approach serving children and youth through a combination of financial and educational supports. Mr. Al-Khatani also described their own work with delivering savings to children and the important role this program has played in further integrating the children’s parents into the formal financial system.

Watch the full session here!

Access the presenters’ slides or additional resources below

We were thrilled to be part of Global Money Week through a Campaign Commitment E-Workshop for the second year in a row. We are also pleased to have both CYFI and AGFUND as members of the Campaign through their impressive Campaign Commitments!  Find out more here.

We would like to know more about your work too!

Be Inspired. Set Goals. Make a Commitment.

Write to us to find out how to announce your Campaign Commitment and join this global coalition of leaders setting actionable goals for their work to end extreme poverty!

State your Campaign Commitment by contacting us at mycommitment@microcreditsummit.org.


Follow the Campaign’s 100 Million Project:

Learn about the 100 Million Project Project and Campaign Commitments.

Youth Loan Fund Q&A – 2 May 2013 (PovCoP)

Lea en español (traducido por Google) *** Lisez en français (traduit par Google)

Truelift

Missed our meeting this month?

Watch the video below, featuring Justin Sykes from Silatech speaking about their partnership with Al-Amal Microfinance Bank on the Youth Loan Fund in Yemen.  Anton Simanowitz, Social Performance specialist, interviews Silatech in the video below.  For more information on the Youth Loan Fund, take a look at this blog post.

Youth Loan Fund Q&A from Seal of Excellence on Vimeo.

Reflections from Al-Amal

Due to connectivity problems in Yemen, Al-Amal Microfinance Bank (AMB) CEO Mr. Mohammed Al-Lai was not able to join the conversation in the video.  See below for Al-Amal CEO Mr. Mohammed Al-Lai’s insights (received via email) on the partnership experience with Silatech for the Youth Loan Fund.


Can you explain a bit about who was not reached by the Youth Loan Fund and why?

Mr. Al-Lai
The youth Population who were not served in AMB are :
1. The unskilled…

View original post 645 more words